Cedar Waxwing Fledgling.

Recovering America’s Wildlife Act Birders’ Rally (virtual)! 5/24/22

The National Wildlife Federation is hosting a special (and exciting) event with National Audubon Society to mobilize birders to support this legislation: the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act Birders’ Rally! This event will be hosted by Corina Newsome and Tykee James, and we will be joined by special guests including Kenn Kaufman, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, American Bird Conservancy, and more. Take a look at the information below, register, and share widely with your networks!


JOIN US for the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act Birders’ Rally (virtual)!

Tuesday, May 24, 2022

12 – 1 PM ET

Register Here

Calling all bird lovers! We need everyone who cares about birds to rally together for the passage of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (S.2372/HR2773) With historic levels of funding and support from both sides of the aisle, this once-in-a-generation legislation is a rare bird. Join us as we flock together in support of this critical bill, which will help protect birds long into the future and make the enjoyment of birds more accessible for all! Hosted by Tykee James and Corina Newsome, this rally will feature leaders in avian conservation and give you an opportunity to take action to encourage your Members of Congress to vote YES on this bill. Bring your passion and excitement, because we need YOU to push Recovering America’s Wildlife Act over the finish line!

DC Legislative Update: April 4th – 8th, 2022

Check here for the 2022 Senate Calendar
Check
here for the 2022 House Calendar

What’s Happening this Week

  • Both chambers of Congress are in session this week. Friday, April 8th, should be the last day of this work period for both chambers, with a two-week recess scheduled for the work weeks of April 11th and 18th.
  • The Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works is expected to hold a markup that will include S. 2372, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act this Thursday, April 7th at 10 AM EST. Watch the livestream here.
  • The Senate Judiciary Committee voted this afternoon along party lines (11-11) to discharge the nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has moved to discharge her nomination from committee and a final vote is expected be held this evening.
    • Members of the Senate could also vote on a potential COVID-19 supplemental funding measure – a slimmer version of the one that was removed from the FY22 Omnibus Spending Bill that passed in March. It’s also possible the Senate will vote on the compromise Russia trade relations bill this week.
  • The House is expected to consider two pieces of legislation: a bill with contempt charges for two individuals who have refused to testify before the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol and a piece of legislation with COVID-19 relief specific to restaurants.
  • The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released a new report today; Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change.
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

  • Senate Committee on the Judiciary
    • Monday, April 4, 2022 at 10 AM EST: Business meeting to consider the nomination of several judges to the federal bench and for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
  • Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works
    • Tuesday, April 5th, 2022 at 10 AM EST: Implementation of the Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Act: Stakeholders’ needs and experiences
    • Wednesday, April 6th, 2022 at 10 AM EST: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Proposed 2023 Budget. EPA Administrator Michael Regan will testify.
    • Thursday, April 7th, 2022 at 10 AM EST: Committee Business Meeting to consider pending legislation, including S. 2372, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act.
  • Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
  • Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
    • Wednesday, April 6th, 2022 at 2:30 PM: Hearing on treaties, including amendments to the Treaty on Fisheries between the US and Certain Pacific Island States and an Amendment to the Montreal Protocol.
  • Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
  • House Committee on Natural Resources
    • Wednesday, April 6th, 2022 at 10 AM EST: Markup on a number of bills pertaining to public lands management and transfer and H.R. 6651, the Alaska Salmon Research Task Force Act.
    • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations
    • Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands
      • Tuesday, April 5th at 10 AM EST: Investing in Wildfire Management, Ecosystem Restoration, and Resilient Communities: Examining the Biden Administration’s Priorities for Implementation of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law
    • Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife
  • House Agriculture Committee
  • House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis

Congressional News

  • Last week, the House and Senate passed its version of the H.R. 4521, America COMPETES Act. The House and Senate will need to appoint a conference committee to reconcile their different versions of the legislation, a process that could take weeks.
  • NWF President & CEO Collin O’Mara testified before the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis on the value of natural infrastructure last Friday. A full recording of the hearing can be found here.

Administrative News

  • Last Thursday, March 31st, President Biden announced he will order the release of 1 million barrels of oil per day from the nation’s strategic reserves in an effort to combat rising gasoline prices. He has also called on Congress to add pressure to the oil industry to increase drilling on public lands.
  • See here for additional White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics. 

Spotlight: Bill of the Week

Safeguarding Treatment for the Restoration of Ecosystems from Abandoned Mines (STREAM) Act

  • Introduced by: Senators Bob Casey (D-PA) & Mike Braun (R-IN) in the Senate and Representatives David B. McKinley (R – WV 01) and Matt Cartwright (D – PA 08) in the House.
  • Overview: This bill allows states to set aside up to thirty percent of the funding for Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) restoration from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) to address long-term acid mine drainage costs. The IIJA set aside $11.3 billion for the AML trust fund for state AML programs.
  • A fact sheet about the STREAM Act can be found here.

DC Legislative Update: March 28th – April 1st, 2022

Check here for the 2022 Senate Calendar
Check
here for the 2022 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

  • Senate Committee on the Judiciary
    • Monday, March 28, 2022 at 3 PM EST: Business meeting to consider the nomination of several judges to the federal bench and for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court.
  • Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources
  • Senate Committee on the Budget
  • House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Highways and Transit
  • House Agriculture Committee
  • House Committee on the Budget
  • House Committee on Financial Services
  • House Committee on Energy and Commerce
  • House Committee on Natural Resources
    • Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife
      • Tuesday, March 29, 2022 at 2 PM EST: Hearing to consider the following bills; Red River National Wildlife Refuge Boundary Modification Act, Keep America’s Refuges Operational Act of 2022 and the Advancing Human Rights-Centered International Conservation Act of 2022.
    • Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources
    • Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples
      • Thursday, March 31, 2022 at 1 PM EST: Legislative hearing to examine; Quapaw Tribal Landowner Settlement Act of 2021, Advancing Equality for Wabanaki Nations Act and legislation to reauthorize the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Trust Fund.
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis

    • Friday, April 1, 2022 at 9:30 AM EST: Hearing on America’s natural solutions: the climate benefits of investing in healthy ecosystems. Collin O’Mara, NWF President and CEO, will testify.

Congressional News

  • Representative Don Young of Alaska, who passed away at age 88 last Friday, will lie in state on Tuesday.
  • Representative Jeff Fortenberry (R-Neb) will resign on Thursday after being found guilty of lying to federal elections officers about illicit campaign contributions.
  • Last week, the Senate confirmed more judges to the federal bench and moved forward with a procedural vote on the America COMPETES Act. It will now move to cloture vote this week.

Administrative News

  • Today, President Biden released a summary of his Fiscal Year (FY) 2023 budget request. This “skinny” budget provides an outline for Congress to begin negotiations on FY 2023 funding and more details are expected to come. The Office of Management and Budget Director, Shalanda Young will be on the Hill to testify about the President’s budget this week before both the House and Senate. Highlights are below;
    • Increased funding for the Department of Energy, including $48.2 billion in discretionary funding.
    • Calls for funding for ecosystem restoration, including $407 million for the Florida Everglades restoration project.
    • A 25% increase in funding for the Department of Interior.
    • More funding to increase domestic renewable energy resources and to return to Obama-era levels of funding to help finance clean energy investments internationally.
  • After his trip to Germany last week, President Biden in conjunction with the European Commission announced plans to find 15 billion cubic meters of liquefied natural gas for imports to Europe.
  • Jessica Ennis will join the White House Council on Environmental Quality as its new public engagement director. Ennis previously worked for Earthjustice as the legislative director for climate and energy. She will help carry out the White House’s Environmental Justice priorities through work alongside activists and stakeholders.
  • The White House released a final rule on CAFE standards, increasing the penalties for automakers who do not meet fuel economy standards going back to model year 2019.
  • See here for additional White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week

  • The Senate and House are in session this week.
  • The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold a business meeting today to discuss a number of nominees to the federal bench as well as Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination to the Supreme Court. It is expected that the committee will postpone the vote on her nomination for about a week in order to leave the Congressional Record open for comments. Her nomination is still expected to come to the Senate floor before April 8th.
  • The Senate will hold a cloture vote this evening on the Senate substitute for the America COMPETES Act. This will bring the vote one step closer to a formal conference committee.
  • The Senate could take up the House-passed bill suspending normal trade relations with Russia and Belarus later this week. The bill had stalled following objections from Senator Paul.
  • The House is expected to vote this week on a bill to end federal prohibitions on marijuana. A full list of bills expected to be voted on by the House is here.
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

Spotlight: Bill of the Week

Lead Safe Housing for Kids Act

  • Introduced by: Reps. Jesus “Chuy” García (IL-4), A. Donald McEachin (VA-04) & Ayanna Pressley (MA- 07)
  • Overview: This bill aims to reduce lead exposure to children living in federally-assisted housing. The bill will adopt measures such as comprehensive risk assessments, requiring the disclosure of lead paint usage by landlords, and providing a process and assistance for relocating families if lead hazards are found.
  • A full press release on the Lead Safe Housing for Kids Act can be found here.The logo of the National Wildlife Federation is circular and features a raccoon wearing a ranger hat.

New Report Examines Habitat Loss Impacts on Wildlife, Hunting, Fishing

 ‘America the Beautiful’ Initiative Recognizes Role of Sporting Community in Restoring Wildlife Habitat

DENVER (March 28, 2022) — Habitat loss is threatening the wildlife, lands, and waters that hunters and anglers rely upon — and sportswomen and sportsmen have a crucial role to play in seeking common-sense solutions, according to a new report from the National Wildlife Federation Outdoors.

The United States is losing nature at an unprecedented rate. According to this report, species lost, on average, 6.5 million acres of vital habitat over the last two decades. This loss varies by species with some iconic species, such as mule deer, well exceeding the average. 

The report examines effective solutions, including the America the Beautiful initiative and the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, that will conserve, restore, and reconnect our natural systems and reclaim degraded lands in order to recover wildlife and protect sporting traditions. As the report notes: “By conserving, connecting, and restoring 30% of our lands and water by 2030, we can slow the loss of habitat, provide important game and fish species with the room to stabilize and recover, and meet the needs of the sporting community today and in the future.”

As leaders in Congress consider historic investments in natural infrastructure and wildlife habitat, which includes restoration and resilience projects, the report urges hunters and anglers to take the lead and use their extensive knowledge from the field to speak out for wildlife decline and habitat loss. 

“Hunters and anglers are firsthand witnesses to nearly everything that happens in the fields, forests, and on the water,” said Aaron Kindle director of sporting advocacy for the National Wildlife Federation. “We have seen how habitat loss is a very real threat to our sporting future, and that we need to utilize all tools in the toolbox to incentivize the conservation of native landscapes and the restoration of degraded areas. We hope this report shines light on these issues and spurs investment as soon as possible.”  

Visit the National Wildlife Federation Media Center at NWF.org/News

The logo of the National Wildlife Federation is circular and features a raccoon wearing a ranger hat.

DC Legislative Update: Feb 28–Mar 4, 2022 

Check here for the 2022 Senate Calendar
Check
here for the 2022 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
  • Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, & Forestry Committee
    • Wednesday, March 2 at 10am EST: Hearing to consider the nominations of Christy Goldsmith Romero to be a commissioner of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), Kristin Johnson to be a commissioner of the CFTC, Summer Mersinger to be commissioner of the CFTC, and Caroline Pham to be a commissioner of the CFTC.
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
    • Wednesday, March 2 at 10am EST: Hearing on implementation of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Pete Buttigieg, Secretary of Transportation, will testify.
  • House Agriculture Committee
  • House Homeland Security Committee
  • House Judiciary Committee
    • Tuesday, March 1 at 10am EST: Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties Subcommittee hearing on discrimination against Muslim, Arab, and South Asian American communities.
  • House Natural Resources Committee
  • House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

Congressional News

  • With just under two weeks before government funding runs out on March 11th, details on an appropriations deal for the remainder of Fiscal Year 2022 remain scarce. Last week, President Biden requested an additional $6.4 billion to support Ukraine against the invasion by Russia. Congress could add this funding to a larger appropriations package, or we could see piecemeal funding bills passed up until the 11th. Given the amount of work on the appropriations committees’ plates, there could also be a very short funding extension to keep the government open beyond March 11th. Senator Ben Ray Luján of New Mexico remains absent from the Senate as he recovers from a stroke. His absence impacts Democrats’ ability to command a majority in the chamber. He is expected to recover and return to the Senate within a few weeks.

Administrative News

  • President Biden will provide his State of the Union address to Congress at 9pm EST on Tuesday, March 1. Even with the Russian invasion of Ukraine taking center stage, the President is expected to devote part of his speech to the need for climate action. The speech follows just a day after the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released its latest installment of the sixth climate assessment, focused on how changes will affect humans and natural ecosystems. You can view NWF’s press release on the report here.
  • On Friday, President Biden announced his selection of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson as his nominee to succeed Justice Stephen Breyer on the Supreme Court. Judge Jackson will begin meeting with Senators this week as the chamber prepares for her confirmation proceedings. A confirmation hearing with the Judiciary Committee is expected to come quickly, although the exact timeline has not been announced.
  • See here for additional White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week

  • Both chambers of Congress are in session this week.
  • The House will begin by considering 8 bills under suspension, and will likely move later in the week to consider legislation related to toxic exposures for military servicemembers under a rule. Action on a Fiscal Year 2022 funding bill or emergency supplemental funding to provide aid to Ukraine is possible.
  • The Senate is in session and will open the week by moving to consider a House-passed bill that protects the right of Americans to receive an abortion. A vote on the motion to consider is expected to fail, after which the chamber will take up the Postal Service reform that has been before Congress for a few weeks.
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.
    The logo  of the National Wildlife Federation is circular and features a raccoon wearing a ranger hat.
    www.nwf.org

DC Legislative Update:  January 10–14, 2022

Check here for the 2022 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2022 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, January 11, 2022, at 10am EST: Hearing to examine the opportunities and challenges for maintaining existing hydropower capacity, expanding hydropower at non-powered dams, and increasing pumped storage hydropower.
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
    • Wednesday, Jan 12, 2022 at 2:45 PM EST: Business meeting to consider the nominations of David Uhlmann to be assistant administrator for enforcement and compliance assurance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Henry Christopher Frey to be Assistant Administrator for the EPA’s Office of Research and Development, and Martha Williams to be Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    • The Business Meeting will be followed by a hearing on Water Resources Development Act Oversight: USACE Implementation of Water Infrastructure Projects, Programs, and Priorities. The hearing and business meeting are both accessible at the link provided above.
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
  • House Agriculture Committee

Congressional News 

  • On January 3rd, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer sent a letter to Senate Democrats stating his intention to again consider two pieces of voting rights legislation, the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act. Under Senate rules, these bills need 60 votes to advance – they have both failed to reach that threshold on previous attempts. In the letter, Senator Schumer indicates that the Senate will consider rule changes – likely including changes to the filibuster – if there is no bipartisan cooperation on advancing these bills. He set a deadline of January 17th, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, for debate on rules changes.
  • Further Senate consideration of the Build Back Better Act is expected to remain on hold while the chamber seeks a breakthrough on voting rights legislation.
  • As a reminder, the government is funded through February 18, 2022 by a continuing resolution that Congress passed in December. Congress must pass a new spending bill before midnight on Feb. 18 to avoid a government shutdown.

Administrative News

  • On Tuesday, January 11, President Biden will travel to Georgia to highlight his administration’s efforts to pass legislation protecting the right to vote. His remarks may shed further light on the degree of his support for filibuster reform in the Senate.
  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has invited President Biden to deliver his 2022 State of the Union address to Congress on March 1st.
  • Last week, President Biden re-nominated a batch of nominees whose nominations had expired when the Senate adjourned its 2021 session. The list includes Laura Daniel Davis, formerly of NWF, to be an Assistant Secretary of the Interior, and Martha Williams to be Director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The full list is available here.
  • See here for additional White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week 

  • The House and Senate will both be in session this week, with the House returning for the first time in 2022.
  • The Senate will consider Commerce Department nominees and continue work on voting rights legislation.
  • The House will consider a Veterans Affairs bill and a NASA Other legislation may be added to the schedule.
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.
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www.nwf.org

Public hearing on proposed wildlife rule changes set for Jan. 20

Public hearing on proposed wildlife rule changes set for Jan. 20

The Natural Resources Commission’s Division of Hearings has scheduled a virtual public hearing to accept public comments on proposed rule changes governing fishing tournament licenses/permits, trapping wild animals, and registering to be an organ donor through the DNR’s license system. More information about the proposed changes is at wildlife.IN.gov/rule-regulation-changes/

The virtual public hearing will be held at 7 p.m. ET on Jan. 20, 2022, using WebEx.

Individuals may join the public hearing in two ways:

Those who have never used WebEx should begin the process at least 10 minutes early because they will be prompted to download WebEx before joining the meeting. For technical assistance, contact Scott Allen at 317-232-4699 or sallen@nrc.IN.gov.

Public comments must be submitted to the NRC no later than Jan. 21, 2022, via www.IN.gov/nrc/rules/rulemaking-docket. Click on “Comment on this Rule” next to the “Fish & Wildlife and Law Enforcement Miscellaneous Rule Amendments.”

Comments can also be mailed to:

Natural Resources Commission
Indiana Government Center North
100 North Senate Ave., Room N103
Indianapolis, IN 46204

The NRC will review the public comments before voting on final adoption of the changes in March. Rule changes that are given final adoption by the NRC must still be approved by the Attorney General’s office and Governor’s office and filed with the Indiana Register before taking effect.

To view more DNR news releases, please see dnr.IN.gov.

Media contact: Linnea Petercheff, Licensing and Permits Supervisor, DNR Fish & Wildlife, 317-233-6527, LPetercheff@dnr.IN.gov

Saturday, January 29th Conference to be Fully Virtual

For the health and safety of our attendees, staff, and conference presenters, the Indiana Wildlife Federation board has decided to host a fully virtual conference  due to the rise in Indiana coronavirus cases. As you may recall, the event was originally scheduled to be a hybrid in-person/virtual event at the Garrison located at Fort Harrison State Park.

We have already seen a greater number of registrations for virtual attendance so we felt it best for our friends and partners to attend safely from home (sweatpants encouraged). While we will be sad to miss another year to gather together and enjoy time with other wildlife experts and enthusiasts, we are still very excited to host two incredible keynote speakers and one heck of a silent auction.

In an effort to respect everyone’s Zoom-attention span, we have reduced our full day agenda down to a hot 2.5 hours without losing any punch. We hope you will join us Saturday, January 29th from 9:30am-noon to hear from Dr. Mamie Parker and Jim McCormac.

>> GO HERE TO REGISTER <<

Dr. Mamie Parker sits at a large table with name plate Mamie A Parker.Dr. Mamie Parker is a professional fish and wildlife biologist and made history serving as the first African American U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) Regional Director of the 13  northeastern states after working in the Great Lakes and Big Rivers regions. She has received numerous conservation awards and is widely known for her tireless work on wildlife conservation and invasive species. Dr. Parker is a transformational speaker with incredible conservation experience ready to share a message on Our Pivotal Stretch to Make the Best Better.

Be sure to read the fantastic National Wildlife Federation blog post: Dr. Mamie Parker Leads the Way for Women in Conservation.

Jim McCormac  who servedOhio DNR (retired) botanist Jim McCormick at the Ohio Department of Natural Resources for 31 years as a botanist, and later specializing in wildlife diversity projects, especially involving birds.  He shares his experience in nature through stunning photography and interpretive storytelling that captivates and inspires. Jim has authored or coauthored six books, including Birds of Ohio, and Wild Ohio: The Best of Our Natural Heritage. We are so pleased to host Jim speaking on Flora, Moths, and Birds: A Tangled Ecological Web.

There are at least 2,600 species of moths and approximately 150 butterfly species in Indiana. The conspicuous and often showy winged adults are but the short-lived finale of a four stage life cycle: egg, pupa, caterpillar, and adult. It’s caterpillars that make much of the natural world go around, and countless billions become food for other organisms, birds included. Without vegetation-eating caterpillars and the native plants that they require, most songbirds would vanish, insect diversity would plummet, and our forests would fall silent. This richly illustrated talk delves into the seemingly magical synergy between flora and caterpillars, and its ecosystem ramifications, especially for birds.

We hope to virtually see you there!
Registration is $25 for members/$35 non-members.

>> GO HERE TO REGISTER <<

(Psst…High school and college students can apply to attend at no cost through our scholar registration fund supported by IWF board members Rick Cockrum, Tina Mahern, and John Goss).

NWF Legislative Update: December 13 – 17, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings  

  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
    • Wednesday, December 15, 2021 at 10am EST: Executive Session to consider a series of measures and nominations, including S. 46, the Restoring Resilient Reefs Act, and S. 3309, to Secure Semiconductor Supply Full list of items for consideration here.
    • Thursday, December 16, 2021 at 10am EST: Hearing to consider the following nominations: Ann Claire Phillips to be Administrator of the Maritime Administration; Steven Scott Cliff to be Administration of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and John Edward Putnam to be General Counsel of the Department of Transportation.
  • Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs
  • Committee on House Administration

Congressional News 

  • Last week, the House passed two NWF-supported bills: R. 5608, the Indian Buffalo Management Act and H.R. 2074, the Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act. Both bills will require further action in the Senate, where the Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act has not yet been introduced. Click here for NWF’s press release on the Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act, and here for the press release on the Indian Buffalo Management Act.
  • Last week, Congress passed and the President signed legislation creating a single-use, fast-track procedure for raising the Debt Ceiling, a major item on Congress’ end-of-year to-do list. The measure allows the Senate to pass a debt ceiling bill on a simple majority, without the two-thirds vote threshold typically required to end debate on legislation and move to a final vote. Legislation to actually raise the debt ceiling is expected in the House this
  • Last week, NWF CEO Collin O’Mara testified in support of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act during a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on the bill. Collin and the other witnesses fielded questions on the bill from the Senators in attendance, who demonstrated broad support for this NWF Click here for the NWF press release on the hearing, and here for the Committee’s website, where you can access a recording of the hearing, and copies of the written testimony from each witness.

Administrative News  

  • Last week, the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) released its Fall 2021 Unified Action Plan for upcoming regulatory In the plan, the administration outlines its intent to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas industry, improve safety and emissions standards for pipelines, restrict the use of Hydrofluorocarbons, encourage automakers to reduce emissions from vehicles and transition fleets to zero-emissions technologies, and more. You can read the White House statement on the plan here and view OIRA’s materials related to the plan here.
  • See here for additional White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week 

  • The House and Senate are both in session this week.
  • The House has a short agenda, and is expected to introduce and quickly pass legislation to raise the Debt Ceiling. The debt ceiling legislation is expected to put off additional action on the federal government’s debt obligation until after the 2022 elections in
  • The Senate will work on confirming judiciary nominees, and will also take up consideration of the National Defense Authorization Act compromise, which passed the House last week.
    • Senate committees will continue meetings with the Senate Parliamentarian to review provisions of the Build Back Better Act and ensure that the legislation abides by the rules of the Budget Reconciliation process. This week’s meetings will likely include challenges from the minority to certain provisions in the bill. The majority may defend provisions’ inclusion, and the parliamentarian will begin issuing rulings for items that cannot proceed under the reconciliation
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

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D.C. Legislative Update: December 6 – 10, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

Congressional News

  • Recovering America’s Wildlife Act – Collin O’Mara to Testify: On Wednesday, December 8 at 10am EST, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee will hold a hearing on S. 2372, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. NWF CEO Collin O’Mara will testify in support of the bill. He will be joined on the witness panel by Dan Ashe of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, Sara Parker Pauley of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies, and Jonathan Wood of the Property and Environment Research Center. Recovering America’s Wildlife Act has gained 32 Senate cosponsors – including 9 of the 20 members of the Environment and Public Works Committee – and 137 in the House. This hearing is a major step towards passing this key NWF priority, and it reflects the enthusiastic support of this bipartisan group of legislators, our partners, and the entire Federation Family.
    • More details on the hearing, including a livestream link are available at the Committee website here, and livestreams are also available on Twitter, and YouTube.
  • Last week, Congress passed and the president signed a stopgap government funding bill, preventing a government shutdown. The law funds the government at existing levels through February 18, 2022, with the addition of $7 billion to support Afghan evacuees. Congressional leaders are continuing to negotiate on a full-year spending package for Fiscal Year (FY) 2022. The House and Senate appropriations committees have each posted their proposed funding bills for FY22, available here: Senate Committee; and House Committee.

Administrative News 

  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics. 

What’s Happening This Week

  • The House and Senate are both in session this week.
  • The Senate is expected to consider nominees, and will be engaged with the House on efforts to pass a deadlocked National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022.
    • Senate committees will be meeting with the Senate Parliamentarian to review provisions of the Build Back Better Act and ensure that the legislation abides by the rules of the Budget Reconciliation process.
  • The House is expected to consider R. 5314, the Protecting Our Democracy Act. a possible Continuing Resolution for FY2022 appropriations given the current CR expires this week. In addition, the House is expected to work on a number of suspension bills, including H.R.2074, the Indian Buffalo Management Act, and H.R. 5608, the Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act.
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

    National Wildlife Federation Logo

Endangered Whooping Crane flying low over water.

MI Governor Whitmer leads Bipartisan Coalition of Great Lakes Governors to Protect America’s Wildlife 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 3, 2021
Contact: press@michigan.gov

Governor Whitmer leads Bipartisan Coalition of Great Lakes Governors to Protect America’s Wildlife

LANSING, Mich. — Governor Gretchen Whitmer led a bipartisan group of governors, including governors DeWine (R-OH), Evers (D-WI), Wolf (D-PA), Holcomb (R-IN), Walz (D-MN), and Pritzker (D-IL), in sending a letter to leaders of the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources voicing their support for the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act.

“Our fish and wildlife and their natural habitats are one of our greatest assets, and any threats to them impact not only our environment but also our economy,” said Governor Whitmer. “The future of Michigan’s economy rests on our ability to come together and protect our wildlife and natural resources. That’s why I am proud to come together with a bipartisan coalition of governors to support the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. I want to thank Congresswoman Dingell for her leadership on this issue and I look forward to working with anyone to put Michiganders first and working hard to protect our natural resources and environment for future generations.”

“The passage of RAWA would mark a big step forward for states like Michigan that continually struggle to secure long term support for species without dedicated sources of funding, including those that are threatened or endangered,” said Michigan Department of Natural Resources Director Dan Eichinger. “RAWA will allow Michigan to annually invest as much as $30 million more in managing and protecting species that are important to our ecosystems and Michiganders. The result will be even more conservation success stories for our state and the nation.”

Passage of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will help promote and enhance our nation’s conservation efforts and ensure the long-term health of fish and wildlife throughout the country.

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, sponsored by Congresswoman Debbie Dingell (D-MI-12), would:

  • Fund conservation efforts for more than 12,000 species of wildlife and plants in need of assistance by providing $1.3 billion in dedicated annual funding for proactive, on-the-ground efforts in every state and territory.
  • Accelerate the recovery of 1,600 U.S. species already listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act.
  • Ensure wildlife recovery efforts will be guided by the congressionally-mandated State Wildlife Action Plans, which identify specific strategies to restore the populations of species of greatest conservation need.
  • Provide Tribal nations $97.5 million annually to fund proactive wildlife conservation efforts on roughly 140 million acres of land.
  • Include improvements to ensure funds are appropriately targeted to the areas of greatest need and facilitate additional investments in protecting at-risk plant species.

To view the full letter, click the link below:

D.C. Legislative Update: November 15-19, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, November 16 at 10am EST: Business meeting to consider pending nominations, including Laura Daniel-Davis to be an Assistant Secretary of the Interior (Land and Minerals Management) and Sara Bronin to be Chairman of the Advisory Council on Historic
    • Tuesday, November 16 at 10am EST: “Hearing On Domestic And International Energy Price ”
    • Thursday, November 18 at 10am EST: “Business Meeting To Consider Pending Legislation,” including a number of public lands and forestry bills. See here for the full list.
  • House Foreign Affair Committee
    • Tuesday, November 16 at 10am EST: Subcommittee: Europe, Energy, the Environment and Cyber hearing on “National Security Implications of Climate Change in the Arctic.”
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, November 16 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing on “Oversight: Plugging in Public Lands: Transmission Infrastructure for Renewable Energy.”
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
  • House Agriculture Committee
  • Senate Finance Committee
    • Tuesday, November 16 at 10:15am EST: ”Hearing to Consider the Nominations of The Honorable Maria Louise Lago, of New York, to be Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade and Lisa Wang, of the District of Columbia, to be an Assistant Secretary of Commerce.”
  • House Energy and Commerce Committee
    • Tuesday, November 16 at 10:30am EST: Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change and the Subcommittee on Energy hearing on “Securing America’s Future: Supply Chain Solutions for a Clean Energy “
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
  • Senate Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry Committee
    • Wednesday, November 17 at 10:30am EST: “To consider the following nominations: Chavonda J. Jacobs-Young to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Research, Education, and Economics, USDA and Margo Schlanger to be an Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, ”
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis
  • Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee
    • Thursday, November 18 at 10:15am EST: “Nominations of Erik Hooks to be Deputy Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; the Honorable Michael Kubayanda to be a Commissioner, Postal Regulatory Commission; Laurel A. Blatchford to be Controller, Office of Federal Financial Management, Office of Management and Budget; and Ebony M. Scott and Donald W. Tunnage to be Associate Judges, Superior Court of the District of Columbia.”

Congressional News 

  • 2372, the Recovering Americas Wildlife Act, now has 33 Senate cosponsors. NWF will continue pushing for more cosponsors and advocating for this critical wildlife conservation bill.
  • In recent weeks, the Senate Appropriations Committee released the remainder of its appropriations bills for the fiscal year See the Committee’s website here for the full text of each bill.

Administrative News  

  • In previous weeks, the EPA issued its proposed rule strengthening, and expanding, methane limits on new oil and gas sector See here for NWF’s press release in support.
  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week 

  • The House and Senate are both in session this week.
  • The House is expected to consider, and vote on, the Build Back Better Act this week.
  • The Senate is expected to take up the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 this
  • NWF continues to work to advance our priorities on Capitol Hill, so please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

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Photo Credit: Emily Wood

CWD Bill Could Provide the Funding and Research Needed to Fight Deer Disease

View original blog at: https://www.nwf.org/Outdoors/Blog/11-03-2021-Chronic-Wasting-Disease

Nov 03, 2021

It seems to never fail in recent years that as Halloween approaches, someone writes about “zombie deer” in regards to Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), which affects cervids like deer, elk, and moose. As a deer hunter who cares deeply about the conservation of the species I hunt, I cringe every time I read this, as deer do not turn into zombies and trivializing the disease does little to stop it.  The new bipartisan CWD Management and Research Act, though, could help with what is really needed to combat CWD: research and funding.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a serious issue affecting wildlife and it has no easy solutions. CWD is a prion disease, related to “mad cow disease,” that leaves cervids like deer, elk, and moose emaciated, wasting away. It is always deadly, either directly or through the effects of its symptoms, though wildlife can be infected and spread the disease long before they show symptoms.

While it has not jumped the species barrier to humans yet, people are advised not to eat the meat of a deer or elk infected by CWD. Hunters in areas positive for CWD should test their game before cooking it. As the disease spreads, these concerns could also depress the hunting participation that pays for the bulk of wildlife conservation efforts. It will take scientific research into how its spread and funding for strapped state wildlife agencies trying to manage it. And that’s exactly what the recently-introduced bipartisan CWD Research and Management Act would provide.

CWD Research and Management Act
The Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act (HR 5608) authorizes $70 million annually in CWD funding, split evenly between management funding to be granted out to state wildlife and agriculture agencies and tribal nations, and funding for CWD applied research grants administered by the USDA. It was introduced by Reps. Ron Kind (D-Wis.) and Glenn Thompson (R-Pa.) and has already passed the House Agriculture Committee.

“Southwest Wisconsin has been ground zero for CWD in whitetail deer country for 20 years,” said Doug Duren, a southwest Wisconsin farmer and deer hunter who organized a carcass disposal program to reduce the spread of CWD. “For a variety of reasons, the disease continues to spread and grow in prevalence. In parts of the area prevalence has grown to 50% or more in bucks. Several counties are seeing 20-25% positive rates in all deer tested. Deer numbers are still high in many areas, but as disease prevalence grows, the deer herd is and will trend younger. We need to work on Healthy Deer Management and ensure this resource for the future.”

The management section of the act will prioritize funding where incidence of CWD is the highest, where jurisdictions have the highest financial commitment to managing, monitoring, surveying, and researching CWD, for efforts to develop comprehensive CWD management plans, to areas showing the greatest risk for initial occurrences of CWD, and to areas responding to new outbreaks of CWD.

“Although many hunters and concerned citizens have worked creatively and cooperatively with Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources to fight the disease by providing carcass disposal dumpsters, convenient testing drop-off kiosks and education on CWD, efforts have been limited by funding,” said Duren. “To fight CWD we need to ‘Buy time and Pay for science’ and the new funding included in the CWD Research and Management Act will help scientists, game managers, hunters and the public do just that.”

The research section will be administered by the USDA through cooperative agreements and prioritize methods to test CWD in live deer and the environment, testing methods on non-live cervids, genetic resistance to CWD, sustainable cervid harvest management practices to reduce CWD occurrence, and factors contributing to local occurrence of CWD.

The National Wildlife Federation adopted a resolution in 2017 calling for the creation of a federal Fish and Wildlife Disease Trust Fund to respond to wildlife diseases like CWD to provide rapid response funding to states for fish and wildlife disease outbreaks..

“Chronic wasting disease is one of the greatest threats facing deer, elk, and moose populations across the country, jeopardizing hunting opportunities, ecosystems, and our nation’s outdoor economy,” said Mike Leahy, director for wildlife, hunting, and fishing policy for the National Wildlife Federation. “We are grateful for Representatives Kind and Thompson’s steadfast leadership on this critical issue. The bipartisan Chronic Wasting Disease Research and Management Act will help ensure state and Tribal agencies on the front lines of controlling this disease have the resources they need to better understand and stop its spread.”

The legislation is supported by the National Wildlife Federation, the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, the National Deer Association, the Mule Deer Foundation, the Boone & Crockett Club, and the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

As a Michigan deer hunter living in a state with CWD, I’m encouraged that real solutions and funding are advancing. I’m looking forward to deer camp in November, hopefully harvesting some venison, and having the deer tested for CWD to ensure that it’s safe to eat. Research and management funding is what our deer and elk need, not sensational headlines about “zombie deer.” The real effects of CWD are scary enough.

National Wildlife Federation Logo
Drew YoungeDyke is the Director of Conservation Partnerships for the National Wildlife Federation Great Lakes Regional Center, strengthening the federation’s partnerships with independent affiliate conservation organizations in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, as well as managing media outreach and communications for the region. 

2021 IWF Annual Member Meeting: Proposed Bylaws Amendments

To maintain clear transparency of our organization, the IWF annually hosts a meeting with members to share updates, track progress on goals, and to make any amendments to our bylaws. Members are invited to attend this virtual meeting to be hosted on:

IWF Annual Member Meeting
Thursday, December 2nd, 2021

6:00-7:00pm 

 

>> Click to Review Proposed IWF Bylaws Changes<<
Proposed changes to bylaws were approved by the board on 10-27-21 and are shown in red. These bylaws changes in general are related to our board processes shifting largely to virtual communications during COVID 19. The redlined portions reflect in certain and limited cases, usually regarding legislation, the board may need an expedited vote via electronic means.   

To register and receive your meeting link, please send an RSVP email to: wood@indianawildlife.org

 

 

D.C. Legislative Update: October 18-22, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, October 19 at 10am EST: “Full Committee Hearing to Consider Pending Nominations” including Mr. Willie L. Phillips, Jr. to be a Member of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Mr. Brad J. Crabtree to be an Assistant Secretary of Energy (Fossil Energy and Carbon Management), and Charles F. Sams III to be Director of the National Park Service.
    • Tuesday, October 19 at 2:30pm EST: Public Lands, Forests, & Mining Subcommittee Legislative See here for the full list of pending legislation.
    • Thursday, October 21 at 10am EST: Hearing to consider pending legislation on topics including public lands, forests, and See here for the full list of bills.
  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
  • House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
    • Wednesday, October 20 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation hearing on “Achieving Mission Balance: Positioning the Coast Guard for the Future.”
  • House Energy and Commerce Committee
  • House Natural Resources Committee
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis
  • Senate Judiciary Committee
  • Senate Indian Affairs Committee
    • Wednesday, October 20 at 2:30pm EST: Roundtable discussion on “Investing in Economic Sovereignty: Leveraging Federal Financing for New and Sustained Development in Native Communities”
  • House Foreign Affairs Committee
    • Thursday, October 21 at 10am EST: Subcommittee: International Development, International Organizations and Global Corporate Social Impact hearing on “Preparing for COP26: United States Strategy to Combat Climate Change through International Development”
  • House Judiciary Committee
  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
    • Thursday, October 21 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight and Subcommittee on Energy hearing on “Judicious Spending to Enable Success of the Office of Nuclear Energy.”

Congressional News 

  • 2372, the Recovering Americas Wildlife Act, now has 29 Senate cosponsors. NWF will continue pushing for more cosponsors and advocating for this critical wildlife conservation bill.

Administrative News 

  • On Thursday, President Biden signed S. 1301, “which provides for authority to increase the debt limit by $480 billion, which is expected to be sufficient to allow the Federal Government to continue to meet its full commitments through early December.” The bill passed the Senate last week in a vote of 50-48.
  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week 

  • This week, the House and Senate are both back from recess.
  • The Senate is expected to focus on outstanding nominations this The Senate is also expected to vote on proceeding to consider the Freedom to Vote Act, which would advance critical reforms to ensure every American is able to exercise their right to vote, including by expanding early voting, making Election Day a federal holiday, and requiring states to have automatic voter registration.
  • The Senate Appropriations Committee released 9 of its 12 appropriations bills today, Monday 18, for the fiscal year 2022.
    • See the Committee’s website here for the full text of each bill. As a reminder, the House Appropriations Committee introduced and held markups on their versions earlier this year.
  • The House is expected to focus on a number of suspension bills.
  • As the White House and Congress continue work on the Build Back Better agenda, including the bipartisan infrastructure package and budget reconciliation, NWF continues to work to advance our priorities around these Please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

National Wildlife Federation Logo

Governor Holcomb announces IN Wetland Task Force

In a press release yesterday, Governor Holcomb announced the appointments to the Indiana Wetlands Task Force:

Indiana Wetlands Task Force

The governor made thirteen appointments to the new task force, who will serve until December 31, 2022:

    • The Honorable Zach Beasley (West Lafayette), Tippecanoe County Surveyor
    • Will Ditzler (Westfield), president of RiverBirch Executive Advisors, who will also serve as chair of the task force
    • Jill Hoffmann (Indianapolis), executive director of the White River Alliance
    • Jared Kakasuleff (Cicero), farmer at Kakasuleff Farms
    • Jeremy Kieffner (Evansville), environmental permit manager at Lochmueller Group
    • Dr. Sara McMillan (West Lafayette), associate professor of Agricultural & Biological Engineering at Purdue University
    • Matt Meersman (South Bend), director of the St. Joseph River Basin Commission
    • Michael Novotney (Valparaiso), Porter County Engineer and director of engineering
    • Commissioner Bruno Pigott, representing the Indiana Department of Environmental Management
    • Kyle Rorah (Dexter, MI), regional director of public policy for Ducks Unlimited
    • Joe Schmees (Fishers), executive director of the Indiana Association of Soil & Water Conservation Districts
    • The Honorable Richard Strick, Mayor of Huntington
    • Jeff Thomas (Fort Wayne), co-owner and vice president of Oakmont Development, LLC

D.C. Legislative Update: Sept 20-24, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • House Foreign Affairs Committee
  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, September 21 at 10am EST: “Full Committee Hearing to Consider Pending Nominations” including Laura Daniel-Davis to be an Assistant Secretary of the Interior (Land and Minerals Management), Camille C. Touton to be Commissioner of Reclamation, and Sara Bronin to be Chairman of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
    • Tuesday, September 21 at 3pm EST: Subcommittee on Tourism, Trade, and Export Promotion hearing on “Legislative Solutions to Revive Travel and Tourism and Create Jobs.”
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
    • Wednesday, September 22 at 9:30am EST: “Business meeting to consider several of President Biden’s nominees, legislation to rename federal buildings, and several General Services Administration resolutions. Immediately following, the committee will hold a hearing on the importance of promoting a circular economy.”
  • Senate Finance Committee
    • Wednesday, September 22 at 10am EST: “Hearing to Consider the Nominations of Christi A. Grimm, of Colorado, to be Inspector General, Department of Health and Human Services and Neil Harvey MacBride, of Virginia, to be General Counsel for the Department of the Treasury”
  • Senate Judiciary Committee
  • House energy and Commerce Committee
  • House Agriculture Committee
  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
    • Thursday, September 23 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Environment hearing on “Advancing Earth System Science and Stewardship at ” This hearing will feature witness testimony from the Honorable Richard W. Spinrad, Ph.D., Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, and Administrator, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • Senate Homeland Security Committee

Congressional News  

  • Last week, components of the Build Back Better Act (budget reconciliation) bill passed out of the Ways and Means and Energy and Commerce Committees. See here for NWF’s press release on passage through Ways and Means outlining support of the committee’s work to strengthen clean energy and technology. Additionally, see here for NWF’s tweet in support of the Energy and Commerce Committee’s work on the Build Back Better Act to advance climate action.
  • NWF sent this letter to the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee in support of Laura Daniel Davis’ nomination to be Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Lands and Minerals Management. Davis, NWF’s former s Chief of Policy and Advocacy, brings the leadership, skills, and experience needed for the role, and NWF supports her swift confirmation.

Administrative News  

  • Last week, NWF sent out a statement urging Congress to pursue needed and overdue reforms to the National Flood Insurance See here for NWF’s press release.
  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week  

  • Both chambers are in session this week. The House is expected to focused on a C.R. for FY2022 – to keep the government funded past the September 30 deadline and into, likely, December, 2021 – as well as the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).
  • The Senate is expected to work on judicial nominations this In addition, we are expecting this week a cloture and full Senate vote on the nomination of Tracy Stone-Manning for Director of the Bureau of Land Management.
  • As Congress continues to work to advance budget reconciliation, infrastructure, and appropriations, please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

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Recycle Used Printer Cartridges & Earn Cash for Indiana Wildlife

Image with cartoon icons and showing the 3 easy steps to recycle printer cartridges and raise money for IWF. Request your free shipping label from http://www.planetgreenrecycle.com/ and use the IWF program code 31793Every day over a million used ink cartridges are thrown away. Use this easy way to recycle your used printer cartridges and it will help us generate much-needed funds while doing our part to preserve the planet.

Click here to retrieve your FREE USPS shipping label to recycle your inks.

 

Be sure to type in Indiana Wildlife Federation code: 31793 when completing the shipping form.  

 

The more people who recycle their used ink cartridges with our Program ID Code: 31793 the more money we raise to protect wildlife and habitats across the state!

Brown County State Park, July 14, 2021. Photo by Abbie Gressley, IWF 2021 Summer Intern

Who needs the Indiana Wildlife Federation?

YOU do—that’s who!

For generations, Indiana has provided a diverse landscape for all who love to be outdoors.  Whether its hiking, biking, boating, fishing, hunting, camping, photography or wildlife watching—Hoosiers love to be outside.   As the population in Indiana grows, so does the pressure on our natural resources to support these cherished activities.

The mission of the Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF) is to promote the conservation, sound management and sustainable-use of Indiana’s wildlife and wildlife habitat.  For over 82 years, IWF has been the statewide voice; loud, clear and strong speaking out for the interests of Indiana conservationists and for the preservation of our outdoor heritage so it may be enjoyed by generations to come.

Emily Wood and Aaron Stump pose after a long, wet day planting trees  and native woodland perennials at Oliver’s Woods Nature Preserve. Indianapolis, June 2, 2021. Photo by Abbie Gressley, IWF Summer Intern

How do we do it?  Through our 3 pillars of focus: Education, Advocacy and Action.  We work across Indiana delivering free environmental education programs that provide clear calls-to-action that encourage everyone to be better stewards of our natural resources and habitats.  IWF is also an agency watchdog in which our board and staff are frequently called upon to give views on bills pending before the legislature, on the actions of resource management leaders and on activities bearing upon our lands, forests, waterways or environment.  We also work to add habitat and expand access through on-the-ground volunteer projects that engage and activate a conservation network across the state.

If you are among those of us that love being outside, then you know it is more than just fresh air and sunshine.  It’s about clean water, healthy ecosystems, abundant habitat and a deep respect for the natural world. If that sounds right to you—then join us and add your support to the growing number of Hoosiers that value Indiana wildlife.

We invite you to join as a member or explore our website to find out more about upcoming events, campaigns, workshops, lecture series or projects that you can get involved with. Like us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to stay connected!

Recovering America’s Wildlife Act Will Prevent IN Wildlife from Becoming Endangered

Right now, one-third of all wildlife species in the United States are at increased risk of extinction. In Indiana alone, more than 150 fish and wildlife species are in urgent need of proactive, on-the-ground conservation efforts before they pass the point of no return.

Congress just took the first step toward making those efforts a reality with the introduction of the bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. This bill will fund proactive efforts led by state fish and wildlife agencies and tribes to address the nation’s looming wildlife crisis to prevent species from becoming endangered and will be the most significant investment in wildlife conservation in a generation. (Senate Version) (House Version)

At home here in Indiana, this could add over $14 million dollars to the DNR’s budget to restore native landscapes, protect and restore wetlands, and activate numerous species recovery projects that are outlined in our State Wildlife Action Plan that are in need of funding.

Whooping Crane in Flight

During August and September, congress is at home so this is a perfect time to reach out. Please join our efforts in asking your member of Congress to support the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act to address severe wildlife conservation challenges such as habitat loss, competition from invasive species, disease, climate impacts, and other threats.

Due to committee assignments, US Senator Mike Braun’s support on this bill would be especially influential. We need your help in reaching him first. You can learn more with this IN factsheet, and funding Q & A factsheet; or simply say:  “Senator, please join your colleagues Senators Martin Heinrich and Roy Blunt in cosponsoring the transformative, common-sense bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (S. 2372) today.”

 

EMAIL SENATOR BRAUNsee cosponsor request template below.
CALL: 202-224-4814
TWEET @SenatorBraun

EMAIL SENATOR YOUNGsee cosponsor request template below.
CALL: 202-224-5623
TWEET @SenToddYoung

Send a thank you email to U.S. House Representative Andre Carson, Indiana’s only #recoverwildlife congressional cosponsor.

EMAIL REPRESENTATIVE CARSONSee thank you template below.
Call: 202-225-4011
TWEET @RepAndreCarson

Need a template letter?

Subject Line: Please Co-Sponsor the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, S. 2372

Dear Senator,

America’s wildlife are essential for our national heritage and our $887 billion dollar outdoor economy. But thanks to challenges like habitat loss, invasive species, emerging diseases, and climate change we’re losing ground and species — and fast.

Right now, more than one-third of our fish and wildlife species are at-risk of becoming extinct. We have already lost more than 150 species that are presumed extinct and another 500 species are missing in action. State fish and wildlife agencies have identified more than 12,000 species of greatest conservation need. 

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will accelerate the recovery of these species, including the more than 150 U.S. species listed on Indiana’s State Wildlife Action Plan.

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act is built upon the premise that the best way to save America’s wildlife is through collaborative, proactive, voluntary work before species need more expensive “emergency room procedures” through the Endangered Species Act. I urge you to create a bright future for America’s wildlife and natural heritage by supporting and co-sponsoring S. 2372.  

Sincerely,

Thank-you Letter Template

Subject line: Thank you for supporting the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act 

Dear Representative Carson,

I am writing to thank you for co-sponsoring H.R. 2773, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, and asking you to do all you can to ensure it passes and is signed into law. 

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act invests in proactive, on-the-ground, collaborative conservation efforts that match the magnitude of America’s wildlife crisis. Healthy wildlife populations are a vital component of our national heritage and our $887 billion dollar outdoor economy. But our diverse array of fish and wildlife is in crisis with more than one-third of all species at risk of becoming endangered. Challenges facing our fish and wildlife in the 21st century include habitat loss, climate change, invasive species, and emerging diseases. 

Thank you for standing up for wildlife through your support of this bipartisan legislation. I urge you to continue advocating for passage of the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act in the 117th Congress.

Sincerely,

 

New Video Indiana Climate Change: Fishing the White River

Indiana Wildlife Federation’s “Fishing the White River” shows the threat of climate change to the White River and the current impacts on some of Indiana’s best fly fishing locations.

INDIANAPOLIS, IN (August 23, 2021) – A new 4 min short video released this week explores how fly fishing on the White River in central Indiana has been impacted by climate-driven severe weather over the years. The film focuses on the ways that seasonal flooding and temperature increases are changing White River habitats and other Indiana river systems. Fishing the White River, was released by the Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF), and features local fly fishing guide Jason DeArman of Two Forks Guide Service.

In addition to the video IWF has added online resources at www.indianawildlife.org/climate outlining how equitable policies and programs can create jobs, tackle climate change, and harness the power of nature to enhance long-term health for people and wildlife alike.  “Hunters and anglers are often times the first to notice changes in the environment because of their intimate knowledge of a natural place,” says Emily Wood, executive director of the Indiana Wildlife Federation. “As heavy rain events, hotter summers, and milder winters, become more frequent throughout the Midwest, the IWF hopes to galvanize these outdoor users to take action for climate before these places are gone.”

This video was filmed, produced, and edited by Leslie Lorance of Indianapolis and supported by a grant from the National Wildlife Federation.

Fishing the White River can seen below or viewed on YouTube and the Indiana Wildlife Federation’s Facebook Page.

Goble shows multiple caterpillars on a leaf in one of her cages designed to keep them safe July 18, 2021. The caterpillars eat anywhere from fourteen to twenty before curving into a J and forming their cocoon.

Monarchs have a friend in Indiana

Monarchs have a friend in Indiana

Story and photos by Abbie Gressley, Indiana Wildlife Federation 2021 Summer Habitat Intern

When Amanda Goble first started raising monarch butterflies three years ago, she only knew there weren’t many in her area. Little did she know the process she loves so much would soon be making a larger impact on the monarch population.

“I realize it is a small part to help, but any small thing could make a big impact eventually,” says the 46-year-old from Marion, Indiana.

The eastern migratory population of monarch butterflies decreased by 84% between the winters of 1996–1997 and 2014–2015, and the much smaller western monarch population has declined 74% since the late 1990s, according to the Indiana Monarch Conservation Plan (IMCP).

The IMCP was influenced by those interested in monarch butterfly conservation and habitat restoration in an attempt to reverse the population decline of North American monarchs.

Goble says they had almost lost monarchs in the area due to chemical spraying for bugs on crops and people using them at their own homes without the pollinators. So, she planted milkweed seeds for the monarchs to lay eggs on and had her husband build screened in cages to protect the caterpillars and cocoons from other bugs.

“I have an abundance of praying mantis in my yard, and they will eat them, so this gives them a safe place to stay in hopes that they will make it to butterflies,” she says.

Goble starts her process in the spring to make sure the milkweed is growing and plant more if needed. In July, the monarchs start showing up for nectar and begin laying eggs on the plants. She then watches for caterpillars and takes them to the cages to finish growing. It takes about fourteen to twenty days for them to eat before creating a J with their bodies and forming a cocoon. The cocoon will hatch within seven to nine days.

“Finding the caterpillars and letting the butterflies go is about all the hands-on work you need to do, the rest they do on their own,” Goble says. “I try not to interfere with their process too much.”

Goble says she loves the whole process and only wishes to help them grow to adulthood.

“I think it’s fascinating how an egg the size of a pinhead can grow to a caterpillar then change into a butterfly out of a small cocoon,” she says. “Watching them fly away is my favorite part; I say goodbye to each one and wish them well on their journey.”

According to the IMCP, Indiana, along with other Midwestern states, comprises a particularly important portion of the range of the eastern population of monarch butterflies, supplying much of the breeding and migrating habitat that produces the migratory generation of the eastern monarch population.

Goble is one of many in Indiana playing a small role for a much bigger cause for these butterflies.

“I just let the butterflies fly away in hopes that they will live to make new caterpillars and butterflies,” she says. “I hope to continue to give the butterflies a chance to survive and keep coming back to our area.”

 

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill is A Good Step, but Much More is Needed on Climate

The bipartisan infrastructure bill, called the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, is being debated and voted on in the Senate. While the bill touches on many urgent infrastructure needs, it does not directly address climate change at nearly the scale needed. That is why Congress must also pass a larger package that tackles climate change head on.

  • The bipartisan bill does have some good things for climate:
    • Helps reduce climate pollution from cars and trucks and funds electric vehicle charging infrastructure
    • Upgrades the electric grid and transmission system to prepare for new wind and solar as well as smart metering and EVs
    • Helps plug orphan oil and gas wells that are major sources of methane pollution and reclaim abandoned mine lands so they can be restored for nature
    • Invests in carbon capture, use, and storage (CCUS) and direct air capture (taking CO2 out of the air directly so it can be used or stored underground) and the pipelines and other infrastructure needed to move CO2 from where it is captured to where it will be stored or turned into a useful product like concrete
    • Puts some needed funding into ecosystem restoration, wildfire prevention and management, and Western water management.

However, while measures like EV infrastructure, grid upgrades, and CCUS investments help enable future climate gains, there is a lot more needed from Congress to address climate now.  On August 9, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is expected to come out with another update on our warming planet, and will sound the alarm that climate impacts are already widespread and severe in the U.S. Emissions must come down swiftly for the globe to have a chance at keeping within a 1.5-degree warming limit – the point after which impacts become disastrous.

  • Climate items that are not included in the bipartisan bill that are badly needed through a larger budget reconciliation package include:
    • A plan to move electric utilities off of coal and gas in favor of clean power sources by 2035
    • A robust extension of tax credits for installing and producing clean and renewable energy, energy efficiency upgrades, and electric vehicle purchases
    • Tax credits for new transmission lines that will carry electricity from new wind and solar plants to the communities where it will be used
    • Tax incentives for the production of clean energy machinery and electric vehicles so America is leading the way in manufacturing these things at home
    • Investments in ecosystem restoration and resilience that fully meet the need and empower nature to thrive and help draw down CO2
    • A 21st century Civilian Conservation/Climate Corps to tackle climate change, restore our lands and waters, make our communities more resilient, and create jobs

The science is clear: We need to act now if we are going to prevent a climate disaster. This moment is the time to go big and act decisively. Congress must pass the bipartisan bill that sets the stage, then move on to the main event.

Tell Hoosier senators to act on climate now by supporting the inclusion of these items!

EMAIL SENATOR YOUNG
CALL: 202-224-5623
TWEET @SenToddYoung

EMAIL SENATOR BRAUN
CALL: 202-224-4814
TWEET @SenatorBraun

 

DC Legislative Update: August 2 – 6, 2021

DC Legislative Update: August 2 – 6, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

  • Senate Appropriations Committee
  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, August 3 at 10am EST: Hearing to consider the nominations of Dr. Geraldine Richmond to be Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy;Ms. Cynthia Weiner Stachelberg to be an Assistant Secretary of the Interior (Policy, Management, and Budget); and Asmeret Berhe to be Director of the Office of Science, Department of Energy.”
    • Thursday, August 5 at 10am EST: Hearing On The Role Of And Programs Within the DOE’s Office Of Science.
  • Senate Agriculture Committee
    • Thursday, August 5 at 10am EST: To consider the following nomination: Homer L. Wilkes to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Natural Resources and Environment.

Congressional News 

  • Last week, Reps. Lowenthal [D-CA] and Fitzpatrick [R-PA], along with 47 bipartisan cosponsors, introduced the Migratory Bird Protection Act to safeguard and strengthen longstanding protections for North America’s migratory Read NWF’s press release here.
  • NWF’s Tracy Stone-Manning received her first of three floor votes on Tuesday, winning the support of the full Democratic caucus. The Senate will hold one more procedural vote before a final confirmation Timing on these votes is unclear.
  • The Senate, in a bipartisan 58-41 vote, confirmed Todd Kim as assistant attorney general in charge of the Department of Justice’s Environment and Natural Resources Division.
  • The Senate confirmed Janie Hipp for General Counsel of the US Department of Hipp’s nomination advanced through the Senate Agriculture Committee with bipartisan support on May 27.
  • The Senate Agriculture Committee held a hearing on the nominations of Xochitl Torres Small to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Rural Development and Robert Bonnie to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Farm Production and Conservation.
  • The House passed a minibus that included seven appropriations bills, including the Interior-EPA, Energy & Water, and Agriculture subcommittee The Senate begins work on appropriations this week, with three hearings scheduled for the committee.
  • In previous weeks, Democrats on the Senate Budget Committee agreed to a $3.5 trillion top-line spending level to address President Biden’s priorities, laid out in the American Families Plan and American Jobs We expect movement on the budget resolution in the coming weeks.
  • Last week, the Clean Economy Coalition of Color convened to discuss ways that federal investment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs and businesses can ensure every community doesn’t just survive, but thrive in a clean energy future. Stay tuned for the next convening.
  • Last week, NWF’s Collin O’Mara testified before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee – on water infrastructure – and the House Natural Resources’ Water, Oceans, and Wildlife Subcommittee – on a number of wildlife bills, including Recovering America’s Wildlife Act. See here and here for O’Mara’s testimonies, respectfully.

Administrative News 

  • The White House nominated Jainey Bavishi for Assistant Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, Department of Bavishi has advocated for confronting climate change, and, if confirmed, will serve as one of the two top deputies to NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad.
  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week  

  • The House is in The Senate is expected to work on infrastructure this week.
  • Last week, the Senate voted 67-32 to proceed towards consideration of a bipartisan infrastructure Over the weekend, the Senate released bill text for the $1 trillion dollar package – see here for text. We anticipate Senate passage in the coming weeks.
  • NWF will continue to weigh in with offices on organizational priorities. NWF’s statement on the bill is here, and the White House fact sheet is here. In addition, check out this new white paper, led by Brittney Parker and Jessie Ritter, which details opportunities to advance natural infrastructure through FEMA and HUD funding
  • As Congress continues to work to advance reconciliation and appropriations, please feel free to share NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda.

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DC Legislative Update: July 26-30, 2021

DC Legislative Update: JULY 26 – 30, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • Senate Agriculture Committee
    • Monday, July 26 at 5:30pm EST: Business Meeting “To vote on the nomination of Jennifer Moffitt, of California, to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Marketing and Regulatory Programs.”
    • Thursday, July 29 at 10am EST: “To consider the following nominations: Xochitl Torres Small to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Rural Development and Robert Bonnie to be Under Secretary of Agriculture for Farm Production and Conservation.”
  • House Financial Services Committee
    • Tuesday, July 27 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Housing, Community Development and Insurance hearing on “NAHASDA Reauthorization: Addressing Historic Disinvestment and the Ongoing Plight of the Freedmen in Native American ”
  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, July 27 at 10am EST: “Hearing to Examine the President’s FY 2022 Budget Request for the Department of the ” This hearing will feature Secretary Haaland. Secretary of the US Department of the Interior.
    • Wednesday, July 28 at 10am EST: “National Parks Subcommittee Hearing to review the impacts of overcrowding in our national parks on park resources and visitor experiences, and to consider strategic approaches to visitor use management.”
  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
    • Tuesday, July 27 at 10am EST: “Pipeline Cybersecurity: Protecting Critical ”
    • Wednesday, July 28 at 10am EST: Nominations hearing “to consider the presidential nominations of Alexander Hoehn-Saric to be a Commissioner and Chair of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC); Mary Boyle to be a Commissioner of the CPSC; Richard Trumka, Jr. to be a Commissioner of the CPSC; and Grant Harris to be Assistant Secretary for Industry and Analysis at the Department of Commerce.”
  • House Agriculture Committee
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, July 27 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing on “The Toxic Legacy of the Mining Law of 1872”
    • Thursday, July 29 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife “Hybrid Legislative Hearing” on over a dozen wildlife and fisheries bills, including the Recovering America’s Wildlife ” This hearing will feature testimony on the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act from NWF’s own Collin O’Mara. This is going to be a fantastic opportunity to educate new committee members about the bill, discuss the ever-growing coalition of supporters, and emphasize the urgency of advancing the bill this year. The committee will also be looking at other important bills we support, including the MONARCH Act, the Extinction Prevention Act, and the Safeguarding America’s Future Act.
  • House Oversight and Reform Committee
  • House Judiciary Committee
    • Tuesday, July 27 at 2:30pm EST: Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties hearing on “The Need to Enhance the Voting Rights Act: Practice-Based ”
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
    • Wednesday, July 28 at 10am EST: “Examining the Benefits of Investing in USACE Water Infrastructure Projects.” This hearing will include testimony from NWF’s own Collin O’Mara. This is the committee’s kickoff for developing the next Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) bill, which has enormous implications for natural infrastructure, environmental justice, freshwater species, ecosystem restoration, and potential risks associated with dredging and navigation You can watch the hearing here.
    • Thursday, July 29 at 10am EST: “Hearing on the Nominations of Stephen Owens, Jennifer Beth Sass, and Sylvia E. Johnson to be members of the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigations Board.”
  • Senate Judiciary Committee
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis
  • House Science, Space, and Transportation Committee
    • Thursday, July 29 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics hearing on “Enabling Mission Success from the Group Up: Addressing NASA’s Urgent Infrastructure ”
  • House Transportation Committee
  • House Foreign Affairs Committee
    • Thursday, July 29 at 1pm EST: Subcommittee on Europe, Energy, the Environment and Cyber hearing on “Renewable Energy Transition: A Case Study of How International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Technology Benefits American Workers.”

Congressional News 

  • Senators Heinrich [D-NM] and Blunt [R-MO] introduced the bipartisan “Recovering America’s Wildlife Act” to “dedicate $1.4 billion annually to proactive, voluntary, locally-led efforts to recover thousands of at-risk wildlife species, while creating jobs and ensuring US outdoor heritage endures for future ” See NWF’s press release here and more on the bill here.
  • Last week, the House passed the bipartisan “PFAS Action Act,” introduced by Reps. Dingell [D-MI] and Upton [R-MI], that would address the contamination and cleanup of dangerous chemicals that endanger the health of humans and See NWF’s press release here.
  • Last week, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted on the nomination of NWF’s own Tracy Stone-Manning for Director of the Bureau of Land Management. She received a 10-10 vote, meaning the Senate will next take up a vote to discharge her nomination from committee.
  • Senator Casey [D-PA] introduced legislation to create a “21st-century Civilian Conservation Corps to address the environmental and economic crises facing American communities. The bill establishes a Civilian Conservation Corps that partners with state and federal agencies, NGOs, and local partners to create on-the-ground conservation projects that conserve and restore public lands as well as private working lands, including conservation projects on farms as well as restoration of abandoned mines and contaminated lands. The bill would also ensure the programs create good paying jobs and job training for future employment, particularly in frontline ” See NWF’s press release here.
  • In previous weeks, Democrats on the Senate Budget Committee agreed to a $3.5 trillion top-line spending level to address President Biden’s priorities, laid out in the American Families Plan and American Jobs We expect movement on the budget resolution in the coming weeks.v

Administrative News 

  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week 

  • The Senate is beginning the week with a focus on nominations, including the nomination of Todd Sunhwae Kim to head the Department of Justice’s Environment and Natural Resources Division, as members continue to try to work out a bipartisan infrastructure agreement.
  • The House is considering an appropriations minibus package, H.R. 4502, which includes seven of the twelve appropriations bills including Agriculture, Energy-Water, Interior-Environment, and We expect floor consideration later this week.
  • The July convening of the Clean Economy Coalition of Color will occur on Wednesday, July 28 from 6- 7:30pm EST. This convening will revolve around “ways that federal investment in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs and businesses can ensure every community doesn’t just survive, but thrive in a clean energy future.” Register here to attend.
  • As Congress continues to work on appropriations and budget reconciliation, NWF will continue to advocate for organizational See NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda for more.

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Photo Credit: Steven Mueller, IWF Board Member

Legislative Call to Action: Tell U.S. Senator Todd Young to protect Indiana’s wildlife and habitats

THE SHORT VERSION

A senate version of the historic Recovering America’s Wildlife Act was just introduced in the U.S. Senate and Indiana Senator Todd Young plays an important role in advancing the legislation.  We need your help reaching him with this specific message:

“Senator Young, please join your colleagues Senators Martin Heinrich and Roy Blunt in cosponsoring the transformative, common-sense bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (S. 2372) and supporting its inclusion in the bipartisan infrastructure package currently being negotiated.”

EMAIL SENATOR YOUNG
CALL: 202-224-5623
TWEET @SenToddYoung

 

THE LONG VERSION

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, just introduced in the U.S. Senate (S. 2372), will catalyze collaborative, on-the-ground habitat restoration projects, help with species reintroductions, tackle disease, and boost other much needed conservation efforts to match the magnitude of the wildlife crisis.

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will help conserve our nation’s fish and wildlife by dedicating $1.3 billion for state-level conservation and $97.5 million to Tribal Nations to recover and sustain healthy fish and wildlife populations. The funding will be used to implement on-the-ground conservation efforts such as conserving and restoring habitats, fighting invasive species, reintroducing native species and tackling emerging diseases for more than 12,000 species. These state-identified Species of Greatest Conservation Need are outlined in the congressionally mandated State Wildlife Action Plans to inform their conservation actions in each state. The additional funding to Tribal Nations will allow for the expansion of conservation efforts on their lands, which provide vital habitat for hundreds of fish and wildlife species, including more than 500 species listed as threatened or endangered. Dedicated and robust funding is essential to recovering species already listed as threatened or endangered and to preventing additional species from needing “emergency room” measures through the Endangered Species Act. 

Indiana Senator Todd Young plays an important committee role and we need your help in reaching him with the following message:

  • Senator, please join your colleagues Senators Martin Heinrich and Roy Blunt in cosponsoring the transformative, common-sense bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (S. 2372) and supporting its inclusion in the bipartisan infrastructure package currently being negotiated.
  • This bill will create jobs restoring natural infrastructure and enhancing wildlife habitat in every state in the country. A bipartisan, comprehensive infrastructure package should ensure our wildlife survives for future generations, and this bill is the silver bullet to make sure that happens.
  • Indiana DNR lists over 150 species of plants and wildlife species in our state that are threatened or endangered. This bill could add over $14 million to Indiana’s fish and wildlife recovery programs.
  • This bill will help recover wildlife across the country by investing in habitat restoration that will also restore wetlands, forests and prairies to help reduce flooding, improve drinking water, and reduce carbon.
  • This complementary funding for fish and wildlife restoration and conservation will create jobs and drive efficiency and responsiveness when executing the many gray and green projects that will result from a comprehensive surface transportation and infrastructure package.

 

Photo credit: Maria Overlay

New Bill Would Galvanize Wildlife Conservation, Help Prevent Extinctions in Indiana

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

National Wildlife Federation Logo     

New Bill Would Galvanize Wildlife Conservation, Help Prevent Extinctions in Indiana

 

Indianapolis, IN (July 21, 2021) — New bipartisan legislation in the House and Senate will fund locally-led efforts to help prevent extinctions and help wildlife thrive nationwide. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will send approximately $14.5 million to Indiana each year, which the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (IN-DNR) will use to help the over 150 species of concern in Indiana, such as the Whooping Crane, Lake Sturgeon, and our own Indiana Bat.

“We are facing a looming wildlife crisis. This commonsense, bipartisan bill will allow us to get ahead of the problem by stepping in to help at-risk wildlife early with collaborative, voluntary measures,” said Indiana Wildlife Federation executive director, Emily Wood. “This will also create jobs restoring our constantly threatened wetlands, prairies, and forests.”

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act was just introduced in the Senate by Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.). Representatives Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.) and Congressman Jeff Fortenberry (R-Neb.) introduced a similar version of the  Recovering America’s Wildlife Act in the House in April.

“The historic, bipartisan Recovering America’s Wildlife Act is by far the most important piece of wildlife legislation in the past half century,” said Collin O’Mara, president and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation. “At a time when more than one-third of wildlife species are at heightened risk of extinction, this critical legislation will help recover thousands of at-risk species through proactive, collaborative efforts in every state, territory, and Tribal nation, creating jobs while preventing extinctions. We applaud the incredible bipartisan leadership of Senator Heinrich and Senator Blunt, and their House partners Rep. Dingell and Rep. Fortenberry, who are all demonstrating once again that wildlife conservation can unite all Americans.”

Nationwide, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act dedicates $1.4 billion annually to locally-led wildlife restoration efforts, with most of the money going to wildlife agencies like IN-DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife who will use the money to implement existing plans for at-risk wildlife. At least 15 percent of the funds will be used to help species that are already considered endangered or threatened. Additionally, Tribal Nations would share $97.5 million annually to fund wildlife conservation efforts on the tens of millions of acres under Tribal management nationwide.

More than 1,500 businesses and organizations have signed on in support of the legislation, including Backcountry Hunters and Anglers, Bass Pro Shops, Ducks Unlimited, Indiana Conservation Alliance, Indiana Wildlife Federation, Izaak Walton League, National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, National Wild Turkey Federation and Wild Birds Unlimited.

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The Indiana Wildlife Federation has played a part in conserving Indiana’s natural resources since 1938. As the nonprofit, grass-roots affiliate of the National Wildlife Federation; IWF mission is to promote the conservation, sound management and sustainable use of Indiana’s wildlife and wildlife habitat through education, advocacy and action. 

 The National Wildlife Federation is America’s largest conservation organization uniting all Americans to ensure wildlife thrive in a rapidly-changing world.

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DC Legislative Update: July 19 – 23, 2021

DC Legislative Update: July 19 – 23, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • House Financial Services Committee
    • Tuesday, July 20 at 10am EST: “Building Back A Better, More Equitable Housing Infrastructure for America: Oversight of the Department of Housing and Urban ”
  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, July 20 at 12pm EST: Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States legislative hearing on R. 442 (Rep. Young), the Alaska Regional Health Consortium Land Transfer Act, and H.R. 3496 (Rep. Gallego), the Urban Indian Health Providers Facilities Improvement Act.
    • Tuesday, July 20 at 3pm EST: Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands Oversight Hearing titled “Examining the Potential for a Civilian Climate Corps.”
  • Wednesday, July 21 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife Oversight hearing on “Examining the President’s Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Proposal for the S. Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.”
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
  • Wednesday, July 22 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Chemical Safety, Waste Management, Environmental Justice, and Regulatory Oversight hearing on “Examining Current Issues Adversely Affecting Environmental Justice ”
  • House Agriculture Committee
    • Wednesday, July 21 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry hearing on “The U.S. Wood Products Industry: Facilitating the Post COVID-19 Recovery.”
  • Senate Judiciary Committee
  • Senate Foreign Relations Committee
    • Wednesday, July 21 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on East Asia, the Pacific, and International Cybersecurity Policy hearing on “Combatting Climate Change in East Asia and the Pacific”

Congressional News 

  • Last week, Democrats on the Senate Budget Committee agreed to a $3.5 trillion top-line spending level to address President Biden’s priorities, laid out in the American Families Plan and American Jobs We expect movement on the budget resolution in the coming weeks.
  • The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted 13-7 to pass the bipartisan Energy Infrastructure Act of 2021 which aims to create jobs and put people back to work restoring degraded lands, strengthening community resilience, expanding clean energy and carbon capture technology, and reducing wildfire risk. See here for NWF’s press release, including a link to Collin O’Mara’s previous testimony on the bill.
  • Last week, the Senate voted 72-27 to confirm Nellie Liang as the Treasury Department’s undersecretary for domestic finance and 91-8 to confirm Donald Remy’s nomination to be deputy secretary of Veterans
  • On July 16, Senators Bennet [D-CO] and Heinrich [D-N.M.] introduced S.2369, the Tribal Access to Clean Water Act of 2021. The bill would provide substantial appropriations to federal agencies tasked with addressing clean water infrastructure on tribal lands and would ensure that all Native Americans are able to access clean water for drinking and See here for the Senators’ press release.

Administrative News 

  • On July 15, the U.S. Forest Service announced plans to repeal the Alaska Roadless Rule and to end large-scale old-growth logging on the Tongass as part of the Southeast Alaska Sustainability Strategy. See here for NWF’s press release.
  • See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s Happening This Week 

  • As Congress continues to work on appropriations and budget reconciliation, NWF will continue to advocate for organizational priorities. See NWF’s 117th Congress National Policy Agenda for more.
  • NWF, the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center and Reimagine Appalachia are hosting an event on Wednesday, July 21, from 2-3pm EST to evaluate the potential for a twenty-first century Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Register here to attend.
  • House is back in session this week and is expected to take up the PFAS Action Act on the floor this week.

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DC Legislative Update June 28 – July 2, 2021

DC Legislative Update June 28 – July 2, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

  •  House Appropriations Committee
    • Monday, June 28 at 5:30pm EST: “Markup of Fiscal Year 2022 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Subcommittee Appropriations ”
    • Tuesday, June 29 at 11am EST: “Markup of FY2022 Report on the Suballocation of Budget Allocations, Legislative Branch and Financial Services and General Government Appropriations ”
    • Wednesday, June 30 at 1pm EST: “Markup of FY2022 Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies and Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations ”
  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
    • Tuesday, June 29 at 10am EST: Hearing on “The State of Federal Wildland Fire Science: Examining Opportunities for Further Research and Coordination.”
  • House Financial Services Committee
    • Tuesday, June 29 at 3pm EST: Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion hearing on “The Legacy of George Floyd: An Examination of Financial Services Industry Commitments to Economic and Racial Justice.”
    • Wednesday, June 30 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Financial Institutions hearing on “Addressing Climate as a Systemic Risk: The Need to Build Resilience within Our Banking and Financial System.”
  • House Energy and Commerce Committee
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, June 29 at 1pm EST: Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife Legislative Hearing on H.R. 1851, R. 1869, H.R. 3877, and H.R. 4099.
    • Wednesday, June 30 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations hearing on “Toxic Coal Ash: Adverse Health Effects from the Puerto Rico Plant and Options for Plant ”
    • Wednesday, June 30 at 1pm EST: Committee on Natural Resources Office of Insular Affairs Legislative Hearing on H.R. 1317 and R. 1126.
  • House Agriculture Committee
    • Wednesday, June 30 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research hearing on “Supply Chain Recovery and Resiliency: Small Producers and Local Agricultural ”
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis

Congressional News

  • Last week, the House voted to pass the methane CRA by 229-191. The purpose of this CRA is to reverse a rule made by the previous Administration that lifted methane pollution limits on new oil and See here for NWF’s newest factsheet on the consequences of methane pollution.
  • A number of nominees were confirmed by the Senate last week, including Shannon Estenoz to be Assistant Secretary of Fish and Wildlife and Parks at the Department of the Interior by voice vote.
  • The Senate passed the bipartisan “Growing Climate Solutions Act” last NWF has endorsed the legislation as it aims to help farmers, ranchers, and forest owners who participate in carbon markets.
  • Senator Bennet [D-CO] introduced the Oil and Gas Bonding Reform and Orphaned Well Remediation This bill would clean up tens of thousands of orphaned wells while strengthening bonding requirements to ensure accountability in future cleanups. See here for NWF’s press release.
  • Last Thursday, NWF’s Collin O’Mara testified before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on various infrastructure priorities and the need to “address the potential of harnessing nature and human innovation to mitigate and solve the growing climate crisis.” You can view the video of the hearing See here for NWF’s statement.
  • On Tuesday, the Senate took a procedural vote on the For the People Act, a sweeping voting rights bill that would modernize our voting systems, bolster election security, and break down the barriers to voting faced by marginalized communities, climate and wildlife advocates, and Senators voted 50-50 on the legislation, which did not advance.

Administrative News

  •  See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics. Additionally, see here for the White House’s fact sheet in support of the $1.2 trillion Senate Bipartisan Infrastructure

What’s Happening This Week

  • The Senate is in recess until July 12 and the House is in through Thursday. We anticipate this week there will be floor debate and a vote on the Invest in America Act, a $715 billion surface transportation bill, and other infrastructure bills from the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and the water focused pieces from the House Energy and Commerce Committee.
  • This week, NWF’s Wildlife Team, affiliates (including Indiana Wildlife Federation), and partners will continue their virtual fly-in focused on R.2773, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act of 2021. The fly-in has held, and anticipate more, meetings with Members of Congress and their staff to discuss the importance of the legislation and to urge cosponsorship of this essential bill.
  • NWF sent its “National Policy Agenda for the 117th Congress” to Capitol Hill. While this isn’t an exhaustive list of all of our federal priorities, we think it provides an excellent picture of the critical work our policy team is undertaking in Congress and with the Administration. See here for the full document and please feel free to share this link (https://www.nwf.org/2021-national-policy- agenda) with a breakdown of the document on NWF’s website.

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DC Legislative Update: June 7-11, 2021

NWF DC Legislative Update: June 7-11, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

 

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
    • Monday, June 7 at 11am EST: Subcommittee on Environment hearing on “Defining a National ‘Oceanshot’: Accelerating Ocean and Great Lakes Science and Technology.”
    • Wednesday, June 9 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Research and Technology hearing on “Building Regional Innovation Economies.”
  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, June 8 at 10am EST: Full Committee Hearing to Consider Pending Nominations, including:
      • Tracy Stone-Manning to be Director of the Bureau of Land Management;
      • Shalanda H. Baker to be Director of the Office of Minority Economic Impact, Department of Energy;
      • Samuel T. Walsh to be General Counsel, Department of Energy; and
      • Andrew E. Light to be an Assistant Secretary of Energy (International Affairs).
    • House Ways and Means Committee
      • Tuesday, June 8 at 10am EST: Hearing on “The President’s Proposed Fiscal Year 2022 Budget with the Department of Health and Human Services Secretary ”
    • House Energy and Commerce Committee
      • Tuesday, June 8 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Commerce hearing on “The Fiscal Year 2022 Department of Commerce Budget.”
  • House Homeland Security Committee
    • Tuesday, June 8 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Recovery hearing on “Examining Climate Change: A Threat to the Homeland.”
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, June 8 at 12pm EST: Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands hearing to examine how to expand access to public lands, including easing permits for tour guides and addressing infrastructure
    • Tuesday, June 8 at 3pm EST: Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife hearing on “DDT Dumping Off the Southern California Coast: Ecological Impacts, Scientific Needs, and Next Steps”
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
    • Wednesday, June 9 at 10am EST: Full committee markup to consider, among others, the:
      • Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute (ANS) to H.R. 1915, the Water Quality Protection and Job Creation Act of 2021;
      • Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute (ANS) to H.R. 3684, the INVEST in America Act
    • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
  • Senate Appropriations Committee
    • Wednesday, June 9 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Interior, Environment “Hearing to examine proposed budget estimates and justification for fiscal year 2022 for the Environmental Protection ”
  • Wednesday, June 9 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education “Hearing on the President’s Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request for the United States Department of Health and Human ”
  • Wednesday, June 9 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development hearing on “A Review of the Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Submission for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Bureau of Reclamation.”
  • Thursday, June 10 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development hearing on “A Review of the President’s FY 2022 Funding Request and Budget Justification for the US Department of Housing and Urban Development.”

Government hearing on the “Office of Management and Budget FY22 Budget Requests.”

Congressional News

  • The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and Senate Finance Committees marked up the Surface Transportation Reauthorization Act of 2021 and the Clean Energy for America Act of 2021, respectively. The former, a bipartisan bill calling for $303.5 billion in investments into surface transportation infrastructure including $350 million for wildlife crossings and billions in climate- targeted investments, passed the committee by a vote of 20-0. The latter would replace current clean energy tax credits with a technology-neutral credit, while also incorporating new labor standards and an added incentive for clean energy deployment and manufacturing in fossil fuel-intensive areas. See NWF’s statement on the bills here.
  • The Senate voted to confirm Eric Lander, Biden’s last cabinet-level nominee, to lead the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
  • The Senate confirmed Kristen Clarke to be Assistant Attorney General overseeing the Civil Rights She was confirmed on a 51-48 vote and is the first Black woman to lead the division. See here for NWF’s tweet in support.
  • The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee voted to advance three nominees to lead the EPA and the Interior The votes included:
    • a 14-6 vote to approve Radhika Fox to be Assistant Administrator for water at
    • a vote of 19-1 to approve Michal Freedhoff to be Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention at EPA
    • a 19-1 vote to approve Shannon Estenoz to be Assistant Secretary of Fish and Wildlife and Parks at the Interior Estenoz’s nomination was also approved by voice vote by the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.
  • The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee approved nominees for positions in the Interior Department. The votes included:
    • a 11-9 vote to approve tribal law expert Robert Anderson’s nomination to be the Department’s Solicitor.
    • approval for Tanya Trujillo to be Assistant Secretary for Water and Science.
  • The Senate Agriculture Committee voted to advance the nomination of Janie Hipp, a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation with decades of experience in agricultural law, to be USDA General See here for NWF’s tweet in support.
  • NWF and our 11 Western Affiliates submitted this letter asking the Secretary of Interior to support continuation and expansion of the Department of the Interior’s efforts to maintain, conserve, and enhance big game migration corridors and winter seasonal ranges across the West, currently formalized through DOI’s Secretarial Order 3362.
  • NWF and 33 state, regional, and national partners sent this letter to congressional leadership calling for prioritization of energy transition communities and fossil fuel industry workers in infrastructure
  • Last week, the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chair DeFazio, Highways and Transit Subcommittee Chair Holmes Norton, and Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials Subcommittee Chair Payne, Jr. introduced the INVEST in America The proposal calls for a five- year, $547 billion surface transportation bill that incorporates many of the Administration’s priorities, including invests of $343 billion in surface transportation. See the committee’ press release for additional resources.

Administrative News

  • On May 24, the Administration announced an increase of $1 billion in funding to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) pre-disaster mitigation “Building Resilience Infrastructure and Communities ” See NWF’s press release in support of the announcement here.
  • On May 25, the White House, along with National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy, California Governor Gavin Newsom, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, and Under Secretary for Defense for Policy Colin Kahl, announced a new effort to advance areas for offshore wind off the northern and central coasts of California. See the White House’s fact sheet here.
  • On May 26, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a proposed listing for the lesser prairie chicken under the Endangered Species Act. NWF supports increased resources to conserve and restore the population and southern Great Plains grasslands through the creation of a new North American Grasslands Conservation Act and support for Farm Bill programs. See the proposed listing here and NWF’s press release here for more.
  • On May 24, NWF sent a letter and issued a statement calling on the US Department of Agriculture and Department of Justice to reconsider their positions in ongoing litigation over a planned mine at Chi’chil Biłdagoteel, also known as Oak Flat, in Arizona See here for NWF’s statement and here for the letter NWF sent to the departments.
  • The EPA on May 27 announced plans to revise the previous administration’s guidance limiting the role of states and Tribes in implementing water quality standards under Section 401 of the Clean Water Act. See here for NWF’s
  • The Administration issued a suspension on oil and gas leasing in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge until the Department of the Interior is given the opportunity conduct a comprehensive review the Coastal Plain Oil and Gas Leasing Read NWF’s press release here.
  • The Administration recently released its $6 trillion-dollar budget proposal for FY22, including allocations and investments into key infrastructure, climate, environment, and related issues The proposed budget, which can be found here as well as on federal agency websites, includes:
    • $350 million for Everglades restoration, a historic increase over prior See here for NWF’s statement.
  • On June 7, the Biden Administration released a decision to reassess the Trump administration’s changes on how federal agencies implement the Endangered Species NWF supports this decision and the continued strengthening of bedrock environment and wildlife laws. See here for NWF’s press release.
  • The Administration issued a proclamation stating June 2021 is National Oceans Month. See here for White House resources, including a comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

 

What’s Happening This Week

  • We expect the Senate to take up nominations, including those listed above and judicial nominees, on the floor this week. The House is in a committee work week, and we expect the Appropriations Committee to work towards marking up bills over the next several
  • Last week, NWF issued a press release, containing this letter, in which 47 of NWF affiliates voiced support for NWF’s Tracy Stone-Manning’s nomination to lead the Bureau of Land Management. The letter was sent to Capitol Hill in advance of Manning’s hearing in the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee on Tuesday, June 8th at 10 am ET. You can watch here!

Senator Heinrich has been circulating a letter calling for investments in natural infrastructure, resilience, and habitat conservation in any upcoming infrastructure package. NWF strongly supports the letter, and urges Senators to sign-on, as the recommendations align with our Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here.

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DC Legislative Update: May 24-28, 2021

 

DC Legislative Update: May 24-28, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

 House Natural Resources Committee

House Appropriations Committee

    • Monday, 24 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development hearing on “FY 2022 Budget Request for the S. Army Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation.”
    • Wednesday, May 26 at 1pm EST: Subcommittee on Defense hearing on “Defense Environmental Restoration.”

Senate Finance Committee

    • Tuesday, May 25 at 9:30am EST: “Hearing to Consider the Pending Nominations of Lily Lawrence Batchelder to be an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, Benjamin Harris to be an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury and Jonathan Davidson to be Deputy Under Secretary of the ”
    • Wednesday, May 26 at 2:30pm EST: “Open Executive Session to Consider an Original Bill Entitled The Clean Energy for America ”

House Energy and Commerce Committee

    • Tuesday, May 25 at 11:30am EST: Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change hearing on “The Clean Future Act and Drinking Water: Legislation to Ensure Drinking Water is Safe and Clean.”
  • House Financial Services Committee
    • Tuesday, May 25 at 12pm EST: Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion hearing on “The Legacy of George Floyd: An Examination of Financial Services Industry Commitments to Economic and Racial ”

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee

    • Wednesday, May 26 at 9:45am EST: “Business Meeting to consider the following items: Shannon Aneal Estenoz to be Assistant Secretary of Fish and Wildlife and Parks of the Department of the Interior; Radhika Fox to be Assistant Administrator for Water of the Environmental Protection Agency; Michal Ilana Freedhoff to be Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention of the Environmental Protection Agency; 10 General Services Administration Resolutions; and the Surface Transportation Reauthorization Act of 2021

Senate Appropriations Committee

  • Wednesday, May 26 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Interior, Environment hearing on “Rethinking Resiliency: Budgeting for the Future of Forest Management.”
  • Wednesday, May 26 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science hearing on “A Review of the President’s Fiscal Year 2022 Funding Request for the U.S. Department of ”
  • Wednesday, May 26 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Homeland Security hearing on “A Review of the President’s Fiscal Year 2022 Funding Request for the U.S. Department of Homeland ”

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

House Agriculture Committee

    • Wednesday, May 26 at 12pm EST: Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight, and Department Operations hearing on “The Future of SNAP: Moving Past the ”

House Oversight and Reform Committee

Senate Agriculture Committee

    • Thursday, May 27 at 9:30am EST: To consider the following nomination: Janie Simms Hipp, of Arkansas, to be General Counsel of the Department of House Judiciary Committee
    • Thursday, May 17 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties hearing on “Oversight of the Voting Rights Act: A Continuing Record of Discrimination”

House Science, Space, and Technology Committee

    • Thursday, May 27 at 1pm EST: Hearing on “Overview of the Science and Energy Research Enterprise of the S. Department of Energy” featuring witness Jennifer Granholm, Secretary of Energy.

Congressional News

  •  On Thursday, the Senate Commerce Committee approved, in a bipartisan voice vote. the nomination of Eric Lander to be the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. In the same hearing, the Committee approved and advanced the nomination of Rick Spinrad for Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • Senator Heinrich [D-NM] introduced the “Schools and State Budgets Certainty Act, with the purpose of ensuring communities, schools, workers and other essential services are provided with needed resources and support during the transition to the clean energy economy. Read NWF’s press release here.
  • This weekend, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee released a draft, bipartisan bill calling for $303.5 billion in investments into surface transportation infrastructure, including $350 million for wildlife crossings and billions in climate-targeted investments. See here for NWF’s press release and here for the Committee’s press release. The Committee will mark up the bill on Wednesday, when they will also vote on the nominations of Shannon Estenoz, Michal Freedhoff, and Radhika

Administrative News

  •  The Administration is expected to release a full fiscal year 2022 discretionary budget request later this week. The request is expected to contain specific provisions to enforce a whole-of-government approach to climate change and related issues.
  • Last week, President Biden signed an Executive Order directing federal agencies to consider climate financial risks in economic assessments. See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other

What’s Happening This Week

  •  This week, the House is in a committee work period, and the Senate is continuing floor consideration of various nominees, including Kristen Clarke to be Assistant Attorney General, as well as continued votes on the Endless Frontiers Act.
  • This week, NWF’s Environmental Justice Team is hosting partners and congressional staff to launch the Clean Economy Coalition of Color (CECC). This event will focus on providing discussion around ensuring federal commitments are realized through an equitable process aimed at building wealth among vulnerable Register here to attend the event on May 26 from 6-8pm EST.
  • The White House has been conducting meetings with bipartisan, bicameral Members of Congress to discuss deals around key infrastructure priorities. We expect movement on, and markup of, a bipartisan surface infrastructure package in the coming in the coming weeks.
  • Senator Heinrich has been circulating a letter calling for investments in natural infrastructure, resilience, and habitat conservation in any upcoming infrastructure package. NWF strongly supports the letter, and urges Senators to sign-on, as the recommendations align with our Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here.

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DC Legislative Update: May 17-21, 2021

DC Legislative Update: May 17-21, 2021

May 17-21, 2021 

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings 

  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources
    • Tuesday, May 18 at 10am EST: Hearing to consider pending nominees, including Robert Anderson to be Solicitor of the Department of the Interior; Ms. Shannon A. Estenoz to be Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks; and Ms. Tanya M. Trujillo to be an Assistant Secretary of the Interior (Water and Science).
  • House Science, Space, and Technology Committee
    • Tuesday, May 18 at 11am EST: Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics hearing on “NASA’S Earth Science and Climate Change Activities: Current Roles and Future Opportunities.”
    • Wednesday, May 19 at 11am EST: Subcommittee on Energy hearing on “Accelerating Discovery: The Future of Scientific Computing at the Department of Energy ”
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
  • Ways and Means Committee
  • House Energy and Commerce Committee
  • Senate Appropriations Committee
    • Wednesday, May 19 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development “Hearings to examine rethinking disaster recovery and resiliency, focusing on protecting communities and accelerating assistance.”
    • Wednesday, May 19 at 3pm EST: Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs “Hearings to Examine Military Infrastructure and Climate ”
  • Senate Appropriations Committee
    • Wednesday, May 19 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing, and Urban Development hearing on “Rethinking Disaster Recovery and Resiliency, Part 2: Protecting Communities and Accelerating ”
    • Wednesday, May 19 at 3pm EST: Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs hearing on “Military Infrastructure and Climate Change.”
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Wednesday, May 19 at 1pm EST: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations hearing on “Misuse of Taxpayer Dollars and Corporate Welfare in the Oil and Gas Industry.”
    • Thursday, May 20 at 12pm EST: Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States (SCIP) “Legislative: Hearing on Tribal-Related Legislation – Including RESPECT Act and Stop ”
  • Senate Agriculture Committee
  • Senate Commerce Committee
    • Thursday, May 20 at 10am EST: Executive Session to consider the nomination of Eric S. Lander to be the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). “
    • Thursday, May 20 at 10:15am EST: “Directly following the executive session, the committee will consider the presidential nominations of Pamela A. Melroy to be Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); Carlos A. Monje, Jr. to be Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy; and Richard Spinrad to be Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere.”

Congressional News

  •  On Thursday, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, in a bipartisan vote of 18-1, advanced the nomination of Tommy Beaudreau to serve as Deputy Secretary of the Department of the NWF issued this press release calling for swift Senate confirmation.
  • On Thursday, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted 15-7 to advance Todd Kim’s nomination to be Assistant Attorney General. The role will lead the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Watch the hearing here.
  • Last week, Senator Gillibrand [D-NY] and Rep. Clarke [D-NY] introduced the Promoting Energy Alternatives is Key to Emission Reductions Act (PEAKER Act, H.R. 3184/S. 1553). The bill would require the Department of Energy to identify power plants that switch on for peak demand, establish a tax credit for clean energy sources or energy storage that replace these plants, and create a grant program to help communities best meet their energy

Administrative News

  •  The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) released a Record of Decision last week, following years of regulatory processes, approving the construction and operation of the Vineyard Wind project off the coast of Massachusetts. See NWF’s press release here, and see here for more on NWF’s offshore wind work.
  • The Administration is expected to release a full fiscal year 2022 discretionary budget request later this month, on May 27. The request is expected to contain specific provisions to enforce an all-of- government approach to climate change and related issues.
  • See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other

What’s Happening This Week

  •  This week, Senate committees are considering the nomination of various Administration
  • NWF expects continued work around appropriations and budget requests as Congress aims to conclude committee hearings in the coming
  • The White House has been conducting meetings with bipartisan, bicameral Members of Congress to discuss deals around key infrastructure priorities. We expect movement on, and markup of, a larger surface infrastructure package the coming weeks.
  • Senator Heinrich has been circulating a letter calling for investments in natural infrastructure, resilience, and habitat conservation in any upcoming infrastructure package. NWF strongly supports the letter as the recommendations align with our Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here.

National Wildlife Federation Logo

DC Legislative Update: May 10-14, 2021

DC Legislative Update

May 10-14, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Upcoming Congressional Hearings

Senate Agriculture Committee

Senate Rules Committee

Senate Environment and Public Works Committee

  • Tuesday, May 11 at 10am EST: Hearing on “Equity in Transportation Infrastructure: Connecting Communities, Removing Barriers, and Repairing Networks across America.”
  • Wednesday, May 12 at 10am EST: Hearing on Interior and EPA Nominees, including Shannon Estenoz to be Assistant Secretary of Fish and Wildlife and Parks of the Department of Interior, Radhika Fox to be Assistant Administrator for Water of the Environmental Protection Agency, and Michal Freedhoff to be Assistant Administrator for Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention of the Environmental Protection

Senate Commerce Committee

House Agriculture Committee

  • Wednesday, May 12 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Conservation and Forestry hearing on “Title II Conservation Programs: Exploring Climate Smart Practices.”

House Appropriations Committee

House Energy and Commerce Committee

  • Wednesday, May 12 at 10:30am EST: Subcommittee on Health of the Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing on “The Fiscal Year 2022 HHS ”
  • Thursday, May 13 at 10am EST: Environment and Climate Change Subcommittee hearing on “The Clean Future Act: Superfund Proposals to Advance Cleanups, Equity, and Climate ”

House Natural Resources Committee

  • Wednesday, May 12 at 1pm EST: Office of Insular Affairs hearing on “Legislative Hearing – Insular Cases Resolution.”
  • Thursday, May 13 at 10am EST: Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States
    Subcommittee hearing on “Oversight: Environmental Justice in Indigenous Communities.”
  • Thursday, May 13 at 1pm EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing on “Legislative: Protecting Coastal Communities and Ocean Resources from Offshore Drilling.”

Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

Congressional News

Last week, Susie Lee [D-NV] introduced the “End Speculative Oil and Gas Leasing Act of 2021” with the purpose of preventing leasing on public lands that have little to no energy development potential. See NWF’s press release here.

On May 4, Rep. Williams [D-GA] introduced the Water Infrastructure Sustainability and Efficiency (WISE) Act to make permanent a requirement that states direct at least 20% of their Clean Water SRF for projects that incorporate the use of green See NWF’s tweet in support here.

On April 30, Rep. Blumenauer’s [D-OR] office announced their support of Rep. Simpson’s new framework on Northwest infrastructure with a focus on investment planning for salmon recovery, jobs, and clean See NWF’s press release here.

Administrative News

Last week, Biden released the administration’s “Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful” 2021 plan – here – laying out a comprehensive ten year plan to restore 30% of national lands and See NWF’s press releases for more:

Biden’s Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful Plan Will Restore Wildlife Habitat, Enhance Sporting Opportunities Historic Conserving and Restoring America the Beautiful Plan Prioritizes Collaboration, Restoration, and Job Creation

On Thursday, the Interior Department released a proposal to review the previous administration’s rollbacks, and to restore protections for bird populations, under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

The Administration released initial information about the President’s fiscal year 2022 discretionary budget request with specific provisions to highlight the all-of-government approach to climate change and related issues. The full budget request is expected later this month.

See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other

What’s Happening This Week

NWF expects continued work around appropriations and budget requests as Congress aims to conclude committee hearings in the coming weeks.

The White House is expected to meet this week, and in the coming weeks, with bipartisan, bicameral Members of Congress to discuss deals around key infrastructure priorities.

Senator Heinrich has been circulating a letter calling for investments in natural infrastructure, resilience, and habitat conservation in any upcoming infrastructure package. NWF strongly supports the letter as the recommendations align with our Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here.

National Wildlife Federation Logo

Funding for Agricultural Conservation Programs Essential to Moving Country to Net-Zero Emissions

Funding for Agricultural Conservation Programs Essential to Moving Country to Net-Zero Emissions

Mike Saccone, National Wildlife Federation, Apr 28, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A broad coalition of 133 conservation, farmer and rancher, sportsmen, and wildlife groups urged the leadership of the U.S. House and U.S. Senate agriculture committees in a letter to ensure the forthcoming infrastructure package includes robust funding for Farm Bill conservation programs and farmer assistance. They specifically urged Congress to double the investment in Farm Bill conservation programs and to ramp up conservation technical assistance funding.

“Increasing baseline funding for the Farm Bill conservation programs and ramping up conservation technical assistance on the ground will enable landowners to mitigate the impacts of drought and flood, improve habitat, improve soil health and long-term food security, create new job opportunities for rural economies, and galvanize the agriculture sector to lead the charge in our fight against climate change,” the organizations wrote in the letter.” We believe farmers, ranchers, and foresters are ready to move agriculture toward net zero emissions if they are provided the tools and resources to make that goal a reality. Action this year on the climate and infrastructure bill represents the best opportunity in decades to meet farmer demand for conservation programs.”

The letter’s signatories are the National Wildlife Federation, Alliance for the Great Lakes, American Farmland Trust, American Fisheries Society, American Grassfed Association, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Arkansas Wildlife Federation, Association of State Floodplain Managers, Bird Conservancy of the Rockies, Blue Ridge Land Conservancy, California Climate and Agriculture Network, California Farmers Union, Capital Region Land Conservancy, Carbon180, Carolina Farm Stewardship Association, Center for Rural Affairs, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Chesapeake Conservancy, Clean Fairfax, Climate Land Leaders, Coastal Enterprises, LLC, Colorado Wildlife Federation, Conservation Coalition of Oklahoma, Defenders of Wildlife, Delaware Nature Society, Delaware Valley Ornithological Club, Delta Waterfowl, E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs), Earthjustice, Environmental Defense Fund, Environmental Law & Policy Center, Environmental Working Group, Florida Wildlife Federation, Inc., Food and Agriculture Committee, Sierra Club, Atlantic Chapter, Food Animal Concerns Trust, Foodshed Capital, Friends of the Mississippi River, Gallatin Valley Land Trust, Georgia Wildlife Federation, Goose Creek Association, Harpeth Conservancy, Hawaii Farmers Union United, Hawk Mountain Sanctuary Association, Healthy Gulf, Heart of the Rockies Initiative, Idaho Wildlife Federation, Illinois Council of Trout Unlimited, Indiana Wildlife Federation, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, Iowa Environmental Council, Iowa Wildlife Federation, Izaak Walton League of America, Kalmiopsis Audubon Society, Kansas Wildlife Federation, Land For Good, Land Trust Alliance, League of Conservation Voters, Louisiana Wildlife Federation, Maine Farmland Trust, Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association, Maryland Bird Conservation Partnership, Maryland Ornithological Society, Mass Audubon, Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, Michigan Farmers Union, Minnesota Conservation Federation, Minnesota Farmers Union, Mississippi River Trust, Mississippi Wildlife Federation, Missouri Farmers Union, Montana Organic Association, Montana Wildlife Federation, National Association of Conservation Districts, National Audubon Society, National Center for Appropriate Technology, National Deer Association, National Farmers Union, National Organic Coalition, National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, National Young Farmers Coalition, Natural Resources Defense Council, NatureServe, Nebraska Farmers Union, Nebraska Wildlife Federation, Neighboring Food Co-op Association, Nevada Wildlife Federation, New England Farmers Union, North American Grouse Partnership, North Dakota Farmers Union, North Dakota Wildlife Federation, Northeast Organic Farming Association-Interstate Council, Northern Virginia Conservation Trust, Northwest Farmers Union, Ohio Conservation Federation, Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, Oregon Climate and Agriculture Network, Organic Farmers Association, Organic Farming Research Foundation, Pasa Sustainable Agriculture, PennFuture, Pesticide Action Network, Pollinator Partnership, Prairie Rivers Network, Quivira Coalition, Rockbridge Area Conservation Council, Rocky Mountain Farmers Union, Rural Coalition, Salem Audubon Society, Savanna Institute, Saving Birds Thru Habitat, Sierra Club, Slow Food USA, Sociedad Ornitologica Puertorriquena, Soil and Water Conservation Society, South Carolina Wildlife Federation, South Dakota Wildlife Federation, Texas Conservation Alliance, The Conservation Fund, The Nature Conservancy, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, Trout Unlimited, Union of Concerned Scientists, Unitarian Universalist Church of Roanoke, Utah Wildlife Federation, Virginia Association for Biological Farming, Virginia Conservation Network, Waterkeepers Chesapeake, Western Landowners Alliance, Wild Farm Alliance, Wildlife Mississippi, Wisconsin Farmers Union, Wyoming Wildlife Federation, and Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.

DC Legislative Update April 19-23, 2021

 

NWF Legislative Update April 19-23, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Congressional Hearings 

  • House Appropriations Committee
    • Tuesday, April 20 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Interior, Environment hearing on the “Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request for the Department of the Interior.”
  • Tuesday, April 20 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Labor, Human Health, Education hearing on “Building Capacity, Building Community: Increasing Investments in Community Colleges.”
  • Wednesday, April 21 at 10am EST: Subcommittee on Interior, Environment hearing on the “Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request for the Environmental Protection Agency.”
  • Wednesday, April 21 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Transportation, House and Urban Development hearing on “Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request for the Department of Housing and Urban ”
  • House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis
    • Tuesday, April 20 at 12pm EST: Hearing on “Making the Case for Climate Action: Creating New Jobs and Catalyzing Economic Growth.”
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, April 20 at 2:30pm EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing, “Building Back Better: Reducing Pollution and Creating Jobs Through Offshore Wind.”
  • Senate Appropriations Committee
    • Tuesday, April 20 at 10:30am EST: “Hearings to examine the American Jobs Plan, focusing on infrastructure, climate change, and investing in our nation’s ”
  • House Appropriations Committee
    • Tuesday, April 20 at 10:30am EST: Hearing on “The American Jobs Plan: Infrastructure, Climate Change, and Investing in Our Nation’s ”
      • Witnesses include Buttigieg, Secretary of Transportation, Regan, Administrator of the EPA, Raimondo, Secretary of Commerce, and Fudge, Secretary of HUD
    • Wednesday, April 21 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee hearing on “Fiscal Year 2022 Budget ”
  • House Foreign Affairs Committee
    • Tuesday, April 20 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Europe, Energy, the Environment and Cyber hearing on “Restoration of the Transatlantic Dialogue: The Global Fight Against Climate Change.”
  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
    • Wednesday, April 21 at 10am EST: Hearing to “consider the presidential nominations of Bill Nelson to be National Aeronautics and Space Administration Administrator and Lina Khan to be a Commissioner of the Federal Trade ”
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
    • Wednesday, April 21 at 11am EST: Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment hearing on “Sustainable Wastewater Infrastructure: Measures to Promote Resiliency and Climate Adaptation and ”
  • Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee
    • Wednesday, April 21: Meeting to consider the nominations of Julie Su for Deputy Secretary of Labor, Cynthia Marten for Deputy Secretary of Education and James Kvaal for Undersecretary of
  • Senate Agriculture Committee

Congressional News 

  • On April 14, the Senate, in a bipartisan vote of 53-45, confirmed Brenda Mallory to serve as Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality. Mallory’s confirmation will ensure CEQ prioritizes environmental justice, climate, and policies that support people and wildlife. See NWF’s press release here.
  • Last week, Senators Luján (D-N.M.) and Cramer (R-N.D.) introduced the Revive Economic Growth and Reclaim Orphaned Wells (REGROW) Act of 2021. The bill focuses on clean-up of orphaned oil and gas wells and is a focus of NWF’s Public Land’s fly-in. See NWF’s press release here.

Administrative News  

  • On April 15, NWF and 15,000 members submitted public comments to the Department of Interior in response to their request for information on needs to reform the US oil and gas leasing system. See NWF’s press release here for more on the submission.
  • On April 16, Secretary Haaland issued secretarial orders to ensure widespread, improved management of public lands with a focus on climate Read NWF’s press release here.
  • The Administration released initial information about the President’s fiscal year 2022 discretionary budget request with specific provisions to highlight the all-of-government approach to climate change and related issues. The full budget request is expected later this spring. See the White House’s notice here.
  • See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s happening this week? 

  • On Monday, President Biden is expected to meet with a bipartisan and bicameral group of Senators and Representatives, all former Governors and Mayors, to discuss the American Jobs Plan. NWF is working with Members and their staff to conduct virtual meetings, emphasizing recommendations from our Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here,
  • This week, the Senate is expected to consider and vote on the nomination of Lisa Monaco for Deputy Attorney General and the nomination of Gary Gensler to the Securities and Exchange Commission.
  • The Senate is expected to vote this week on The Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Act of 2021. The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee voted unanimously last week to report the bill out of committee, see here for their press release.
  • Last Monday, the National Wildlife Federation, Atlantic Council Global Energy Center, and Reimagine Appalachia hosted a successful congressional briefing to discuss the role of climate infrastructure investments in Appalachia. Watch the briefing here.
  • NWF’s Public Lands team is continuing their virtual fly-in, hosting staff and affiliates in meetings with Members and their staff to discuss legislative and restoration and resilience priorities as part of upcoming legislation and larger infrastructure packages.

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DC Legislative Update April 12-16, 2021

DC Legislative Update

April 12-16, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Congressional Hearings

  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, April 13 at 1pm EST: Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States legislative hearing on the “Save Oak Flat Act”
    • Thursday, April 15 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources hearing on “Building Back Better: Creating Jobs and Reducing Pollution by Plugging and Reclaiming Orphaned Wells”
  • Senate Appropriations Committee
    • Tuesday, April 13 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies hearing “to examine the President’s proposed budget estimates for fiscal year 2022 for the National Science Foundation and securing US Competitiveness.”
    • Wednesday, April 14 at 2pm EST: Subcommittee on Homeland Security hearing on “The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s response to COVID-19 and other challenges”
  • Senate Homeland Security Committee
  • House Appropriations Committee
  • House Financial Services Committee
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
    • Wednesday, April 14 at 10am EST: “Business meeting to consider S.914, to amend the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to reauthorize programs under those Acts; to be immediately followed by a hearing to examine the long-term solvency of the Highway Trust Fund, focusing on lessons learned from the Surface Transportation System Funding Alternatives Program and other user-based revenue solutions, and how funding uncertainty affects the highway programs.”
  • Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
  • House Energy and Commerce Committee
    • Thursday, April 15 at 10:30am EST: Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change hearing on “The CLEAN Future Act and Environmental Justice: Protecting Frontline Communities.” Other pieces of legislation under consideration include H.R. 501, the “Climate Smart Ports Act,” and H.R. 862, the “Climate Action Planning for Ports Act of 2021.”

Congressional News

  •  On March 26, Congress passed a bipartisan, NWF supported resolution from Senators Portman & Hirono designating April as National Native Plants Patrick Fitzgerald, NWF’s Senior Director of Community Wildlife, provided a quote for the Senators’ press release, see here.
  • On April 1, Senators Coons, Heinrich, and Lujan introduced a bill to create a 21st-century Civilian Climate Corps that aims to employ millions of young Americans to restore and protect public lands and waters. See NWF’s press release here
  • On March 25, Senator Markey and Congresswoman Dingell introduced the Climate Change Education Act to expand NOAA’s climate change education The link to NWF’s press release is here.
  • On March 24 the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee voted unanimously to advance the Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Act which seeks to expand nation-wide access to clean drinking water. See here for NWF’s press

Administrative News

  •  On March 31, the Biden administration released a jobs and infrastructure plan to “Create Jobs, Resilient Communities, [and a] ‘Visionary’ Civilian Climate ” See NWF’s press release here.
  • The Executive Branch has turned focus to offshore wind by committing to work with stakeholders and partners to protect wildlife and advance environmental justice on future projects. See here for NWF’s Twitter
  • Last week, the Administration released their fiscal year 2022 discretionary budget request with specific provisions to highlight the all-of-government approach to climate change and related See the White House’s notice here.
  • See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other

What’s happening this week?

  •  On Monday, April 12 at 4pm EST the National Wildlife Federation, Atlantic Council Global Energy Center, and Reimagine Appalachia are hosting a congressional briefing to discuss the role of climate infrastructure investments in Appalachia.
  • This and next week, NWF’s Public Lands team is hosting staff and affiliates in a virtual fly-in to discuss legislative and restoration and resilience priorities as part of upcoming legislation and larger infrastructure
  • NWF expects a Senate confirmation vote on Brenda Mallory to lead the White House Council on Environmental Quality early this Mallory’s confirmation was advanced on March 24 following an 11-9 vote from the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.
  • Congress is turning attention to address surface and natural infrastructure priorities, appropriations, and reconciliation. NWF will continue working with Members and conducting virtual meetings, emphasizing organizational recommendations from our newest Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here,

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SB 389: Indiana Wetlands Need Your Help Again

The Quick Version: “Pass it clean in the second reading”

Contact your IN House Rep before Monday, April 12, 2021 with the message:

“Pass SB389 House Committee version clean (with no new amendments) in the April 12 House Environmental Affairs Committee second reading.”

The Full Explainer:

There is both good news and bad news on the wetlands bill, SB 389.  The good news is that on April 7 the House Environmental Affairs Committee significantly amended the Senate version of SB 389 to protect most wetlands by adopting Amendment 24.  The bad news is that some wetlands will lose protection.

In further good news, Representative Errington will be offering an amendment on the House floor to replace what’s currently in SB 389 with language creating a Wetland Task Force to examine state wetland policy. Sadly, we do not anticipate there will be enough support for this good amendment to pass.

A number of Indiana’s strongest conservation organizations have carefully assessed all of the remaining options to try to improve the bill and also carefully gauged the strength of the wetland de-regulation faction of lawmakers at the Statehouse and concluded that, if the Errington Wetlands Task Force amendment fails, the House committee version is the best wetlands language we will be able to get in the 2021 legislative session.

Why would we support a bill that is still bad for wetlands?

Well we don’t, but if the House Environmental Affairs Committee version does not pass, we will likely get something much, much worse.  Many legislators (in both the House and Senate) are in favor of seriously weakening state protections of wetlands. At the next step in the process (second reading), either the Senate passed version of SB 389 bill, which repeals the wetlands law, or an amendment like #19, which is very close to a repeal, will become the final bill.  Please see the table below for a detailed comparison of the Senate version, Amendment 19, and the House committee version.

Therefore, the Indiana Wildlife Federation takes the following positions and urges our supporters to contact their state representatives with the following four requests:

1.) Support Representative Errington’s amendment to replace SB 389 with a Wetland Task Force.

2.) If the Wetland Task Force amendment fails, support the House Environmental Committee version of SB 389.  The committee version, but no further! Pass it clean, with no amendments in the second reading.

3.) Oppose Amendment 19 to SB 389 or any other anti-wetlands floor amendments. Pass it clean, with no amendments in second reading.

4.) Oppose the Senate version of SB 389 (full repeal).

 

Reaching your lawmakers about the above four calls-to-action is crucial to making sure that the House Environmental Committee’s version of SB 389 survives a House floor vote — and the far more damaging version, Amendment 19 (or its equivalent) — does not replace it.  You can reach your lawmakers by going to bitly.com/INLegis.

Great Lakes Conservation Coalition: New Study Models Threat of Invasive Carp to Great Lakes Food Web

Nearshore and shallow bays are at most risk

by Drew YoungeDyke, National Wildlife Federation

A recent study published by the American Fisheries Society models the impacts that invasive carp would have on the food webs of the Great Lakes, predicting significant impacts on Lake Erie, Saginaw Bay, and other bays, river mouths, and nearshore areas. This study comes at a time when movement has occurred on the plans to keep invasive carp out of the Great Lakes, yet much remains to be done.

JUMP TO Great Lakes Conservation Coalition Blog to continue reading…

 

 

Great Lakes Conservation CoaltionAbout Great Lakes Conservation Coalition

The Great Lakes Conservation Coalition is an informal affiliation of conservation groups, including the Indiana Wildlife Federation, working in the Great Lakes region and collectively representing millions of hunters and anglers. Working together, we help advance solutions to the conservation challenges threatening our fish, wildlife, and outdoor heritage.

Over 70 Indiana Conservation Organizations Oppose SB389 Wetlands Repeal Bill

The saga of the anti-wetlands bill, SB 389 continues.  It looks like all of the messages to House leadership have had an effect.  Many thanks to the more than 70 organizations that have joined the sign-on letter!

VIEW FACTSHEET SIGN-ON LETTER HERE

We learned Thursday that the House Environmental Affairs Committee will not be meeting Monday, April 5th, as originally planned.  Instead, the House Republican caucus will be debating SB 389 internally before deciding next steps to take, if any.  We understand that the House Democratic caucus is opposed to SB 389, but hearing from their constituents who support their position will help.

Please, do all you can to get messages to your state representative before Monday asking them to vote against SB 389 or any amendment to SB 389 that reduces wetland protection.  It would be helpful if you know of any local flooding, water quality, groundwater recharge, or lake sediment problems and can mention how those expensive problems will increase if wetlands are lost.  Examples from within their districts really help sway legislators.

Anyone who needs to can find their state representative and contact information at

http://iga.in.gov/legislative/find-legislators/

DC Legislative Update March 22-26, 2021

Congressional Hearings

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

  • House Budget Committee
  • House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee
    • Tuesday, March 23 at 11am EST: Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment hearing on  “The Water Resources Development Act of 2020: Status of Essential Provisions.”
  • House Natural Resources Committee
    • Tuesday, March 23: Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands hearing on “Building Back Better: Examining the Future of America’s Public ”
    • Wednesday, March 24: Hearing on “How the Biden Administration’s Build Back Better Plan Can Benefit the S. Territories.”
  • House Energy and Commerce Committee
  • Senate Environment and Public Works Committee
    • Wednesday, March 24 at 9:30am EST: Business Meeting to consider the nomination of Brenda Mallory for Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality and Janet McCabe to be Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The meeting will also consider “The Drinking Water and Wastewater Infrastructure ”
  • Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee
    • Wednesday, March 24 at 10am EST: Hearing on “Driving the Road to Recovery: Rebuilding America’s Transportation Infrastructure” to examine surface transportation infrastructure needs across the Agenda will also cover the nomination of Polly Trottenberg to be Deputy Secretary of the United States Department of Transportation.
  • Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee
  • Senate Homeland Security Committee
    • Thursday, March 25 at 10:15am EST: Hearing on the “Nomination of Deanne Criswell to be  Administrator, Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.”

Congressional News

  •  Last week, NWF hosted 13 state affiliates including Emily Wood, executive director of the Indiana Wildlife Federation, in a virtual fly-in focused on our agriculture priorities, including on the upcoming Farm Bill and conserving grasslands. The team conducted 32 Hill meetings with both congressional staff and Members of Congratulations and thank you to all that helped organize, lead, and participate!
  • Last week, the Senate, on a bipartisan vote of 54-42, confirmed Deb Haaland to be Secretary of the Interior. NWF and affiliates have led the way in supporting this historic nomination – she is the first Indigenous cabinet secretary – and are excited to partner with the new Secretary and the Department to advance wildlife conservation and public lands See here for NWF’s press release.
  • Last week, Representatives DeFazio, Napolitano and Fitzpatrick introduced the bipartisan “Water Quality Protection and Job Creation Act of 2021” See NWF’s press release here.
  • Last week, Representatives Grijalva and McEachin introduced the “Environmental Justice for All Act” with the purpose of addressing and promoting environmental justice while supporting and empowering frontline communities as the US transitions to a clean energy See here for the House Natural Resources press release and here for NWF’s press release.
  • Senators Coons and Cassidy and Representatives Veasey and McKinley introduced the “Storing CO2 And Lowering Emissions (SCALE) ” This bill focuses on carbon capture and storage to invest billions in connecting CO2 emitters and storage sites. The bill serves as a pivotal step in the US’ path to reaching net- zero emissions by 2050.

Administrative News

  •  Last Tuesday, 116 Democratic members sent a bicameral letter to President Biden in support of his Executive order on 30×30. Republicans also sent a letter on the order, see here for more. Check out NWF’s January press release on the administration’s 30×30
  • See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s happening this week?

  •  Last Monday, NWF hosted a – very successful – virtual Hill briefing on “Mapping Climate & Environmental Justice: Lessons Learned from State Tools.” On Monday March 22, NWF will be hosting the second webinar in the series focused on “Lessons Learned from Local & Regional ” The purpose of this series is to highlight environmental justice mapping tools and their potential in furthering environmental and climate justice. Register to attend today’s 4pm EST briefing here.
  • The House is in recess for the coming weeks, and we expect the Senate to focus on Biden cabinet nominations:
    • Last week, the Senate voted 98-0 to confirm Katherine Tai as the S. Trade Representative.
    • Last week, Sarah Bianchi was confirmed in a 50-49 vote to be Secretary of Homeland
    • Marty Walsh’s nomination for Secretary of Labor, passed on a cloture vote of 68-30. The final vote on confirmation is expected to occur on Monday.
    • This week, the Senate will consider David Turk to be deputy Energy secretary. Turk received a 20-0 vote out of
    • We anticipate the Senate will vote this week on the nomination of Shalanda Young for Director of the Office of Management and
  • Congress is turning attention, and creating hearings, to address surface and natural infrastructure priorities. NWF will continue working with Members and conducting virtual meetings, emphasizing organizational recommendations from our newest Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here.

Report compiled by National Wildlife Federation.

 

Call to Action: Oppose SB389 – Repeal of wetlands protections.

A swiftly-moving (updated) disaster

[Updated Mon. Mar 22, 2021] – Over the weekend, the House Environmental Affairs committee decided against hearing Amendment 11 due to pushback (keep calling/emailing/tagging!) and that they would be working on Amendment 12. It was posted late on Sunday with less than 12 hours to review before the hearing.  Here is Amendment 12.

While there has not been adequate time to review the impacts of the amendment, it is still clearly going to cause major losses to Indiana wetlands. We recommend the same action of reaching out to your state legislators to “Oppose SB389 as a dangerous bill for water quality, wildlife, habitats, and flooding. [End update]

Although Indiana legislators promised to allow a full week for organizations like IWF the time to understand and react to a proposed amendment to SB389 (a full repeal of protections for all state regulated wetlands in Indiana), we now only have the weekend. Despite weeks of negotiation by IDEM and numerous legislators that promised there would be a reasonable compromise; the House Environmental Affairs Committee is going to take up an amendment to the bill that will gut Indiana’s wetlands law. They will meet Monday, March 22, at 10:30 AM.

What’s in Amendment 11?

(SEE FULL AMENDMENT LANGUAGE) | (SEE FULL DETAIL IN BILL TRACKER)

Amendment 11 will lead to loss of much of Indiana’s remaining wetlands. It allows destruction of:

• all Class I wetlands
• up to one acre of Class II or Class III if they are within the borders of a municipality.
• up to 1/2 acre of Class II and 1/4 acre of Class III outside municipalities
• wetlands that are on cropland sold for development
• ephemeral streams

It also greatly reduces the wetland mitigation ratios and it increases the amount of wetland that can be destroyed when there are several wetlands involved in the same development project. Here is a table to illustrate how Amendment 11 weakens existing wetlands protections:

Amendment 11  Existing law 
Exempts all Class I wetlands Exempts ½ acre
Exempts ½ acre of Class II Exempts ¼ acre
Exempts ¼ acre of Class III No exemption
Exempts 1 acre of Class II or III within a municipality No exemption
Enlarges cumulative exemption when there is >1 wetland on a property
Exempts dredge and fill activities in ephemeral streams
Allows wetland destruction for development on cropland that was farmed any time in the last 5 years
Reduces mitigation ratios
IDEM’s time to issue wetland permit 90 days 120 days

If SB 389 passes in its current form or with Amendment 11, Indiana will pay a high price in increased flooding, lost groundwater recharge, lost water purification, and loss of endangered and threatened species. Please do all you can before Monday to tell your legislators, especially members on the House Environmental Affairs Committee to save Indiana’s remaining wetlands by opposing SB 389 and opposing Amendment 11.

You can contact your legislator by finding them here.

You can also send a pre-drafted email to your legislator by using this form graciously created for us by the National Wildlife Federation Water Action Team.

Mulch Madness with Musselman Landscape

Beautify your backyard habitats and landscapes with mulch and support the Indiana Wildlife Federation throughout the ENTIRE year!

When you purchase any landscape products from Musselman Landscape Solutions throughout the year, mention IWF in any way, and we will receive 10% of your sale! See if there is a Musselman near you: you can shop online at MusselmanLandscape.com using our code at checkout. CODE: IWF

mulch to support indiana wildlife federation

DC Legislative Update March 15-19, 2021

Congressional News

  • Last week, the Senate held multiple, bipartisan votes to confirm Biden administration cabinet nominees, including:
    • The Senate voted 66-34 to confirm Marcia Fudge as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development
    • The Senate voted 70-30 to confirm Merrick Garland for attorney
    • The Senate voted 66-34 to confirm Michel Regan as Administer of the EPA.
    • Last week the Senate passed a cloture vote of 54-42 to advance Deb Haaland’s nomination for Secretary of the Interior. We expect a final vote on her confirmation Monday, March 15.
  • The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee voted 20-0 to advance the nomination of David Turk to be Deputy Secretary of
  • The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and Senate Budget Committee both voted 7-6 and 14-8, respectively, to advance Shalanda Young’s nomination to be Deputy Director of the
  • The House, on a vote of 225-206 passed the “Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) ”
  • Last week, Representative Cartwright introduced the bipartisan RECLAIM Act to help recover abandoned coal mine sites for community redevelopment, wildlife habitat, and outdoor recreation opportunities. See NWF’s press release here. The House Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on this topic this
  • Last week, Senators Rosen and Grassley filed bipartisan legislation, the “Fair Returns for Public Lands Act,” to update the oil and gas leasing system to ensure companies pay fair market price. See NWF’s press release here. Relatedly, Tracy Stone-Manning testified before the House Natural Resources Committee on Tuesday at a hearing on several energy development modernization bills. You can view that hearing here.
  • Last week, Senators Whitehouse, Booker, and Schatz introduced the “Methane Emissions Reduction Act of 2021” NWF’s Shannon Heyck-Williams, director of climate and energy policy, was highlighted on the press release here, stating “Methane is one of the most potent drivers of the climate crisis, and Senator Whitehouse’s bill will help reduce oil and gas methane emissions through rigorous tracking, public disclosure, and pollution

These common-sense reforms will buy us some time to reduce all greenhouse gas emissions throughout the economy. This proposal deserves close consideration in Congress.”

Administrative News

 See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

  • The administration heeded the widespread request, highlighted in NWF’s affiliate letter, and scrapped the legal opinion that would have limited the Migratory Bird Treaty Act’s protections. The Interior Department is expected to issue a new proposal to revoke the rule that was based on that
  • Last week, BOEM issued a final environmental review of the Vineyard Wind project, see NWF’s release here.

What’s happening this week?

  •  Last week, the House approved, and President Biden signed into law, the final $1.9 trillion relief package titled the “American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.” The Act, among a host of other positive provisions, will invest in preventing future wildlife-disease See here for NWF’s most recent press release.
  • This week, NWF is hosting partners and affiliates in a virtual fly-in focused on NWF’s agriculture priorities, including the upcoming Farm Bill and conserving We anticipate meetings with a large number of staff and Members of Congress!
  • Now that Congress has passed the COVID reconciliation package, we anticipate Hill discussion and committee work on surface and natural infrastructure priorities. To that end, the House Energy and Commerce Committee Democrats released legislation last week titled the “Leading Infrastructure For Tomorrow’s America Act” (LIFT America Act) calling for investments in the nation’s electric grid, drinking water infrastructure and energy efficiency as part of a larger, $312 billion NWF will continue conducting virtual meetings, emphasizing organizational recommendations from our newest Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in NWF press release here.
  • The House will take up bills to honor Women’s History Month, including H.R. 1620, the” Violence Against Women ” The House will consider H.J.Res. 17 to remove the deadline for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment as well as consider two bills to address immigration reform: H.R. 6, the “American Dream and Promise Act,” and H.R. 1603, the “Farm Workforce Modernization Act.”

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DC Legislative Update March 8-12, 2021

DC Legislative Update from the National Wildlife Federation
March 8-12, 2021

Check here for the 2021 Senate Calendar
Check here for the 2021 House Calendar

Congressional News
• Last week, the Senate voted to confirm multiple Biden administration cabinet nominees, including:

  • The Senate voted 84-15 to confirm Gina Raimondo as Secretary of Commerce. In her new role, Raimondo will focus on, among other priorities, managing ocean fisheries and climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts.

• The Senate Energy Committee held a bipartisan vote of 11-9 to advance Rep. Deb Haaland’s nomination to Secretary of the Interior to the Senate Floor. See NWF’s press release here urging for swift floor confirmation.

• The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 15-7 to advance the nomination of Merrick Garland for attorney general.

• The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee held a hearing on the nominations of Brenda Mallory to serve as Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (see NWF’s press release here) and Janet McCabe to be Deputy Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency. Votes on the nominees are expected soon.

• Early last week, Representative Pallone introduced the “Climate Leadership and Environmental Action for our Nation’s Future Act” also known as the “CLEAN Future Act.” The bill demonstrated the Energy and Commerce Committee’s commitment to legislation that addresses emission reduction, racial and environmental justice, and a clean economy.

  • Last Tuesday, Senators Daines, Manchin, and Stabenow introduced a bipartisan bill to revive the 48C Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit. The bill seeks to dedicate significant investment to support coal communities as the nation transitions to clean power priorities. See NWF’s statement of support here.

• Last Wednesday, the House voted to pass H.R.1, the “For the People Act of 2021.” The bill demonstrates Congress’ commitment to addressing the long-running inequities in our political system in order to create a functioning, healthy democracy. See NWF’s blog in support of the bill here.

Administrative News
• Last week the administration met with Republican and Democratic congressional leaders to focus on upcoming infrastructure needs. At the same time, NWF has been conducting virtual meetings to discuss priorities around a sweeping infrastructure package that will seek to address surface and larger natural infrastructure needs, incorporating priorities from our newest Restoration and Resilience report – located here and in our press release here.

• See here for President Biden’s comprehensive list of Executive orders to address COVID, the climate crisis, and environmental justice, among other topics.

What’s happening this week?
• Last week, the House passed H.R.1319, their version of the budget reconciliation package titled the “American Rescue Plan Act of 2021,” to address President Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID relief plan. Over the weekend the Senate voted 50-49 to pass the bill which now goes back to the House for a vote, expected this week, on final passage. See NWF’s press release here.

• This week, the Coalition for the Delaware River Watershed is hosting a virtual fly-in focused on protecting and restoring the Delaware River Basin.

• We expect the Senate to schedule floor votes on President Biden’s cabinet nominations for later this week, including votes on Marcia Fudge, Merrick Garland, and a cloture vote on Michael Regan and Deb Haaland.

• The Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and Senate Energy and Natural Resources announced their rosters of subcommittee leaders, see the full list for EPW here and proposed ENR list here.

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Biden Administration Reverses Rollback of Migratory Bird Protections

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Biden administration has taken an important step in protecting bird species by scrapping a controversial legal opinion that gutted the Migratory Bird Treaty Act’s protections for hundreds of species of migratory birds. The Interior Department is expected to soon issue a new proposal to revoke the rule based on that interpretation – which was ruled illegal by a court in a lawsuit brought by the National Wildlife Federation and other organizations.

“This bedrock law was designed to protect North America’s birds — whose populations have declined by 3 billion since 1970 — from harm, whether intentional or not,” said Mike Leahy, director of wildlife, hunting and fishing policy at the National Wildlife Federation. “We are extremely grateful to the Biden administration for righting this historic wrong and returning protections to America’s migratory birds. It is vital we safeguard these species and authorize a common-sense permitting approach to avoid further declines so that we may experience birds like whooping cranes and canvasback ducks for generations to come.”

Last week, the National Wildlife Federation and 29 of its state and territorial affiliates submitted a comment letter to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service thanking them for delaying implementation of the controversial rule, and asking the administration to move forward with a new rulemaking process.

Contact: Anna Vecchio, National Wildlife Federation, VecchioA@NWF.org, 202-797-6662

IWF Board President Rick Cockrum delivers virtual remarks for the 2021 Conservation Champion Award.

2021 Conservation Champion Award

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ­­– The Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF) is pleased to recognize two prominent members of the Indiana General Assembly for their longstanding commitment to conservation and natural resources.

State Representative Carey Hamilton (D-Indianapolis) and State Senator Michael Crider (R-Greenfield) are the recipients of the IWF’s annual Conservation Champion award.

This unique honor was established to recognize Indiana lawmakers for their efforts to preserve the state’s outdoor heritage for future generations of Hoosiers.

Rep. Hamilton recently spearheaded the launch of a bipartisan Indiana Legislative Trails Caucus tasked with growing and maintaining Indiana’s many trails and greenways. She has also been a leader in Indiana’s recycling and clean energy efforts.

Sen. Crider, a former conservation officer for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, has championed efforts at the statehouse to keep our parks and outdoor recreation areas accessible for all Hoosiers.

Both lawmakers have demonstrated a clear commitment to conservation as well as the economic and community benefits that accompany it.

The awards were announced on January 30, 2021 during the IWF’s virtual wildlife conference.